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3D Laser Scanning for Heritage

Front cover for 3rd edition of 3D Laser Scanning for Heritage

Advice and guidance on the use of laser scanning in archaeology and architecture

The first edition of 3D Laser Scanning for Heritage was published in 2007 and originated from the Heritage3D project that in 2006 considered the development of professional guidance for laser scanning in archaeology and architecture. Publication of the second edition in 2011 continued the aims of the original document in providing updated guidance on the use of three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning across the heritage sector. By reflecting on the technological advances made since 2011, such as the speed, resolution, mobility and portability of modern laser scanning systems and their integration with other sensor solutions, the guidance presented in this third edition should assist archaeologists, conservators and other cultural heritage professionals unfamiliar with the approach in making the best possible use of this now highly developed technique.

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Laser scanning technology
  • Laser scanning procedures
  • Specifying and commissioning a survey
  • Case studies
  • References
  • Glossary
  • Where to get advice
  • Acknowledgements

Additional Information

  • Series: Guidance
  • Publication Status: Completed
  • Pages: 119
  • Product Code: HEAG155

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