Fortified single storey building in crescent with lawn in front.
The Harwich Redoubt, a scheduled ancient monument, was built in 1808 as part of the Martello Tower chain of defences against a possible Napoleonic invasion. It is managed by the Harwich Society, who are working hard to repair, maintain and open this site once again to the public. Historic England have provided strategic advice. © Historic England Archive DP261861
The Harwich Redoubt, a scheduled ancient monument, was built in 1808 as part of the Martello Tower chain of defences against a possible Napoleonic invasion. It is managed by the Harwich Society, who are working hard to repair, maintain and open this site once again to the public. Historic England have provided strategic advice. © Historic England Archive DP261861

Heritage at Risk: Buildings

At Historic England we've been collecting information on the condition of our built heritage since the publication of our first Register of listed buildings at risk in London in 1991.

The scheme was later extended to cover the built heritage of the whole of England and the first national Register of buildings at risk was published in 1998. Each annual Register includes a range of fantastically diverse buildings and structures across England which are in need of attention and championing. 

In 2011 we started adding information on the condition of listed places of worship to the Register so our national Heritage at Risk Register currently includes:

  • Grade I and II* listed buildings at risk including places of worship
  • Grade II listed buildings at risk in London including places of worship
  • Grade II listed places of worship at risk outside London

Listed buildings in secular use are assessed using the Buildings and Structures risk assessment. Listed buildings in use as places of worship are assessed using the Places of Worship risk assessment.

Wythenshawe Hall is a Grade II* listed 16th-century manor house situated in large registered parkland, dating from 1540. The building has been on the Heritage at Risk Register since 2016 following a devastating arson attack causing significant damage to its Tudor core. Historic England has provided knowledge, expertise and investment of approximately £70,000. Although the building remains on the register there has been some great progress and the building awaits future reuse.

How we can help buildings at risk

Historic England's main role in securing the future of listed buildings is to provide practical advice, guidance and resources to owners and local authorities.

Our involvement is determined by the significance of the building, the complexity and urgency of the case and the potential to contribute to the success and vitality of places and communities.

We can offer help and support with projects including:

  • Analysing the problems facing a building, and making recommendations
  • Helping to identify the opportunities and the feasibility of options for future use
  • Helping to build the skills and resilience of community groups responsible for buildings
  • Helping to broker solutions between partners
  • Providing information on funding

Funding for repairs

Listed buildings at risk can be eligible for funding. Under our grant schemes we can help towards the cost of developing a project, as well as the repairs themselves. In some circumstances we can also help local authorities with the cost of using Urgent Works Notices and Repairs Notices to enforce the repair of listed buildings.

Although listed buildings at risk are a priority for Historic England's repair grants, our funding is limited compared to demand. Grants from other public sources, notably the National Lottery Heritage Fund, continue to be essential in helping secure the future of buildings at risk. Other funding sources can be found in the Heritage Funding Directory

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