Group of people, some waving, next to a small wooden windmill
Brixton Windmill - Friends of Brixton Windmill. Shortlisted for ‘Best Rescue of an Industrial Building or Site’ Angel Award in 2012 © Historic England
Brixton Windmill - Friends of Brixton Windmill. Shortlisted for ‘Best Rescue of an Industrial Building or Site’ Angel Award in 2012 © Historic England

Everyday Heritage

How can we work together with more, and more diverse, people so that more action is taken to support the historic environment?

At Historic England we are in the process of reimagining the way we work with people. We’re holding this big question and doing this work because we believe in the benefit that the historic environment can bring. More than that, it’s because we believe that this benefit will only grow the more people we have adding their perspectives, energy and ideas to shaping and championing the places and traditions that make up our ever-evolving sense of heritage.

On this page:

We wanted to start by learning from the many and varied things that already happen to champion the historic environment. That’s why over the last few months, we’ve been asking for your experiences from up and down the country of supporting the historic places and heritage that matter to you. We’ve had an amazing and generous response, hearing about not only the huge breadth of activity that goes into celebrating and protecting our everyday heritage but what inspires you to get involved and helps you to stick at it?

Last summer I became a cemetery tour guide at Layton Cemetery, Blackpool. After joining a free tour there one Sunday afternoon & hearing the stories beneath the stones I felt compelled to take up the mantle of telling these fascinating tales myself.

I was really proud to be part of getting listed building status for St Helen's Church in Kilnsea. It's a modest and remote little church almost at the end of Spurn Head, now sadly redundant, but it is an early work by William Burges.

We dive the protected 17th century London wreck most weekend's and record it's demise. Due to the constant shipping that affects this site out in the Thames Estuary.

By exploring those stories further and the similarities between people’s experiences, we’ve reached five draft ‘building blocks’. These are the starting points for what might be important to do more of, less of and completely differently in creating a future where more people feel able, inspired and equipped to act in support of the heritage that matters to them. You can read all about the building blocks here.

Read more about the building blocks


We'll update this page with more information as the project progresses.

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