Children enjoying London History Day on 31 May in front of St Paul's Cathedral, London

Children enjoying London History Day on 31 May in front of St Paul's Cathedral, London © Historic England
Children enjoying London History Day on 31 May in front of St Paul's Cathedral, London © Historic England

London History Day

London History Day is an annual celebration of what makes London a unique city, on 31 May.

Launched by Historic England in 2017, London History Day is celebrated on 31 May every year. The date marks the anniversary of the day Big Ben first started keeping time in 1859.

On London History Day 2019, all Londoners are encouraged to go out and enjoy how the history of London’s people and places have contributed to the city’s unique identity. We will celebrate the day on social media by sharing lesser-known stories, historical facts and unique images of London.

A sister event is happening on Friday 24 May 2019: London History Schools Day aims to inspire young Londoners to learn more about the city's cultural heritage and communities.

Celebrate London's people and places

Please click on the gallery images to enlarge.

Share your London History Day

Do you have stories or photos of your favourite places that you would like to share? Tell us about your #LondonHistoryDay on 31 May.

Join the conversation:

Ideas for a London History Day visit

Historic London shopfronts

Discover eight shopfronts that can be appreciated by anyone strolling along the pavements of London, and offer a glimpse into the city’s rich history as one of the world’s most exciting shopping centres.

Discover 8 historic London shopfronts

Architecture on the Underground

London Underground is the world’s oldest metro system: the first journey took place on 10th January 1863, when the Metropolitan Railway opened to the public. It has a history of thoughtful and thorough design and detail.

Explore the architecture on the Underground

The second life of bridges

Many of the bridges that cross the Thames today are not the first structures to have spanned their sites. But what becomes of old bridges after they are demolished?

5 unusual endings for London’s bridges

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