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Royal Military Canal, Warehorne Bridge to Ham Street Bridge

List Entry Summary

This monument is scheduled under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 as amended as it appears to the Secretary of State to be of national importance. This entry is a copy, the original is held by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Name: Royal Military Canal, Warehorne Bridge to Ham Street Bridge

List entry Number: 1005126

Location

The monument may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County: Kent

District: Ashford

District Type: District Authority

Parish: Orlestone

County: Kent

District: Ashford

District Type: District Authority

Parish: Warehorne

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: Not applicable to this List entry.

Date first scheduled: 17-Dec-1986

Date of most recent amendment: Not applicable to this List entry.

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: RSM - OCN

UID: KE 396 J

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Monument

A 1.31 km length of the Royal Military Canal running ENE from Warehorne Bridge to Ham Street Bridge.

Reasons for Designation

The Royal Military Canal was a massive coastal defence work constructed between 1804 and 1809. Its purpose was to separate the expected landing and deployment of Napoleon's troops upon the coast of Romney Marsh and Walland Marsh from the interior of the country. The Government initially considered flooding the marsh but favoured the canal, which was the idea of Lt. Col. Brown, the Assistant Quartermaster-General. He carried out a survey and work commenced in 1804 at the height of the invasion scare, with John Rennie as consulting engineer (until 1805). The canal ran a total of about 28 miles from Shorncliffe Camp via Hythe inland to Appledore, to join the Eastern River Rother at Iden lock, from where it became part of first the Rother and then the River Brede, turning into a canal again from Winchelsea to Cliff End on the coast. Excavated earth formed the banquette and parapet on the landward side of the canal and behind this was an army supply route, the Royal Military Road. On the opposite side were the tow path and wharves. It also included a back and a front drain. The canal and parapets were so built that gun positions could be provided at the end of each length to flank the crossings. However by the time the canal was completed in 1809, the threat of invasion had passed, following Napoleon’s defeat at the Battle of Trafalgar, and it was to some extent obsolete. In 1810, the canal was opened for public use and tolls were also collected for use of the Royal Military Road. In the later 19th century public use declined. The last toll was collected at Iden Lock in December 1909. Today Iden lock is a sluice, so the main part of the canal is isolated. The eastern section of the canal is still in use for pleasure boats.

The Royal Military Canal was an important element in the Napoleonic defences of south-east England and is the only military canal in the country. It is a unique defensive work that bears significant testament to a period when modern Britain faced the most serious threat of invasion prior to the major conflicts of the 20th century.

The 1.31 km length of the Royal Military Canal running ENE from Warehorne Bridge to Ham Street Bridge survives well with a well preserved parapet, a length of the Royal Military Road and the back drain. It will contain archaeological information relating to its construction and use.

History

See Details.

Details

This record was the subject of a minor enhancement on 31 July 2014. The record has been generated from an "old county number" (OCN) scheduling record. These are monuments that were not reviewed under the Monuments Protection Programme and are some of our oldest designation records.

The monument includes a length of the Royal Military Canal, an early 19th century defensive work, situated on Romney Marsh south-west of Ham Street. It runs in a near straight course ENE, except for two ‘kinks’, which were designed to allow enfilading fire along the canal if the enemy attempted to cross it.

The length of canal is water-filled and the surviving features include the parapet, an earthwork bank on the west side, the Royal Military Road which survives as an earthen terrace, and the back drain, which survives as a water-filled ditch. In 1992, a section across the canal was partially excavated prior to the construction of the A2070 Stockbridge to South Ashford road.

Selected Sources

Websites
Romney Marsh Countryside Project: Royal Military Canal website, accessed from http://www.royalmilitarycanal.com/pages/index.asp
Other
NMR LINEAR38. PastScape 1042908.,

National Grid Reference: TQ 99769 32174

Map

Map
© Crown Copyright and database right 2017. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2017. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
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The above map is for quick reference purposes only and may not be to scale. For a copy of the full scale map, please see the attached PDF - 1005126 .pdf

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This copy shows the entry on 18-Oct-2017 at 07:17:31.

End of official listing