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Research on Windows

Early glazing – whether windows, or glass roofs and curtain walls - is arguably the historic building element that suffers most from ill-considered repair and replacement.

Most recently the pressure for change has come through the need to thermally upgrade buildings. Research commissioned by Historic England has been examining heat loss through traditional window systems, measuring thermal transfer in terms of u-values but also looking at draughts and thermal bridging.

The Building Conservation and Research Team have also been studying the special form of secondary glazing that is used to protect stained glass (sometimes called ‘isothermal glazing’, but more correctly ‘protective glazing’).

Windows research
Windows are critical not just to how a building appears, but also to how it acts as an envelope. © Historic England / Robyn Pender

Projects

Thermal Behaviour of Timber-Framed Sash Windows: experimental research to examine heat loss through traditional timber-framed sash windows, looking at the behaviour of complex systems incorporating shutters, blinds, curtains, and secondary glazing.

Thermal Behaviour of Metal-Framed Windows: experimental research to examine heat loss through traditional metal-framed casement windows, looking at the behaviour of complex systems incorporating shutters, blinds, curtains, and secondary glazing.

Protective Glazing of Stained Glass: examining the impacts on the deterioration of stained glass and on the internal and external appearance of the building, and determining optimum parameters for protective glazing systems.

Research into the Thermal Performance of Traditional Windows: Timber sash windows

Research into the Thermal Performance of Traditional Windows: Timber sash windows

Published 1 June 2009

Research into the Thermal Performance of Traditional Windows

How to make sash windows energy efficient

The video below shows the practical steps that you can take to make your sash windows more energy efficient, from having them repaired to installing secondary glazing.

 

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