Colour aerial photo showing
Aerial view of Priest Hutton, looking north-east towards the Pennines, taken on 07-AUG-2014 (28601/23) © Historic England Archive
Aerial view of Priest Hutton, looking north-east towards the Pennines, taken on 07-AUG-2014 (28601/23) © Historic England Archive

Lancashire - Lower Lune, Lower Wyre, Lower Ribble River Valleys Archaeological Survey to National Mapping Programme Standards

One of the largest historic counties by area, Lancashire is an area of relatively low monument density. The project will use aerial photographs and lidar data to survey this relatively unexplored area.  It will complement previous work carried out for the North West Rapid Coastal Zone Assessment.

The aim of the Lancashire NMP is to digitally map and record archaeological features visible on aerial photographs and lidar imagery. It will cover three blocks centred on Lancaster, Blackpool and Preston as well as examining any potential threats to the archaeological remains in these areas. The threats identified so far include housing and infrastructure development.

The project will provide comprehensive digital mapping of the archaeological information contained on aerial images to better inform future management and conservation of Lancashire’s heritage.

The project is funded by Historic England’s Heritage Protection Commissions Programme. It is being carried out by staff from Archaeological Research Services Ltd.

The images used on this page are copyright Historic England unless specified otherwise. For further details of any photographs or other images and for copies of these, or the plans and reports related to the project, please contact the Historic England Archive

   

Simon Crutchley

Remote Sensing Development Manager, Historic England

Simon is a landscape archaeologist and air photo interpreter at Historic England, with over 25 years’ experience of mapping and interpreting features of archaeological and historical interest visible on aerial photographs and other aerial imagery. He has worked in many areas of England including the World Heritage Sites of Avebury and Stonehenge. He has a special interest in “new” technology such as lidar and satellite imagery and its application to archaeological research and investigation.

Contact Simon Crutchley

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