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Heritage Crime NHPP Activity 2B2

This page gives an overview of work carried out 2011-2015 about prevention and enforcement of crimes that affect heritage assets. This was part of the National Heritage Protection Plan.  Users can find full details of our work in this area through the link to the main Heritage Crime pages below.

The owner responsible for bulldozing the Priddy Circles Neolithic enclosure, Somerset, was convicted and fined.
The owner responsible for bulldozing the Priddy Circles Neolithic enclosure, Somerset, was convicted and fined. © English Heritage

Scope and intended protection results

The Activity team works with organisations, communities and individuals to reduce heritage crime and anti-social behaviour, which can seriously affect our heritage. This work is intended to increase awareness of the nature of heritage crime, foster proper recording of it and improve prevention and enforcement.

The heritage crime programme

This Activity incorporated the Heritage Crime Programme. English Heritage, the Police (through the Association of Chief Police Officers) and the Crown Prosecution Service amongst other partners, spearheaded the programme. A growing number of local authorities, community safety partnerships and neighbourhood policing initiatives are playing an integral part in the programme.

Each of these organisations signed a memorandum of understanding on tackling heritage crime, which sets out responsibilities between the partners. The aim was to develop a model for future prevention and enforcement that is realistic, efficient and within existing and anticipated resources. We intend that this model will be sustainable and able to grow in coverage and effectiveness over time.  Neighbourhood Policing and community involvement contributed considerably to improved intelligence and data on the ground.

Lead theft and subsequent water damage at St. Bartholomew’s Church, Minshull, Cheshire.
Lead theft and subsequent water damage at St. Bartholomew’s Church, Minshull, Cheshire. © Image courtesy of St. Bartholemew's Church, Minshull

The Alliance to Reduce Crime Against Heritage

In addition representatives from more than 190 organisations, including The National Trust, The Church of England, Crime Stoppers, National Parks and The Historic Houses Association came together to set up the Alliance to Reduce Crime against Heritage (ARCH). ARCH is a voluntary national network that will help to take forward a range of initiatives and galvanise local action against heritage crime.

Members of ARCH have a shared interest in preventing heritage crime and seeing effective enforcement against it. Through conferences and training events, the group discusses priorities and shares information about heritage crime, carries out training, highlights best practice and makes local contacts.

Find out more about ARCH

Research and guidance

In addition to developing such partnerships to tackle heritage crime, the Activity group carried out research into heritage crime and produced further guidance on this issue- some of the resulting publications can be downloaded below.

For more details of our heritage crime work see the main Heritage Crime page.

Damage caused by lead theft and water damage at St Peter’s Church, Plemstall, Mickle Trafford, Cheshire
Damage caused by lead theft and water damage at St Peter’s Church, Plemstall, Mickle Trafford, Cheshire. © Image courtesy of St. Peter's Church, Plemstall

 

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