TREE-RING ANALYSIS OF TIMBERS FROM BUILDINGS AT FORTY HALL, ENFIELD, LONDON

Author(s): Dr Martin Bridge

Two buildings on the site of Forty Hall, Enfield were investigated. The roof of the main house was found to be constructed from fast-grown oaks with short ring sequences. A 63-year chronology from this roof remains undated. Timbers from the stable block appear to have come from a variety of sources. Only three timbers from the roof dated. All three were tie beams and were found to have come from oaks felled between AD 1476 and 1499. This is much earlier than expected on stylistic grounds. A single re-used, moulded beam used as a floor joist also gave a date for its outer ring (without sapwood) of AD 1430. The ring-width sequences from three other roof timbers were combined to give a second chronology of just 70 years. This failed to date against the first site chronology or any other material. This, combined with the use of coniferous wood for two principal rafters, suggests a second, probably later, phase of renovation of the stable roof.

Report Number:
103/1997
Series:
AML Reports (New Series)
Pages:
12
Keywords:
Dendrochronology Standing Building

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