THE HUMAN SKELETAL REMAINS FROM FARMER'S AVENUE, CASTLE MALL, NORWICH (EXCAVATED 1989-91)

Author(s): S Anderson

Human skeletal remains from 85 burials and 29 disarticulated contexts are discussed. The material dates to the 10th-11th centuries AD. The articulated remains represent a minimum of 58 adults (23 males, 41 females, 1 unsexed) and 26 children. Demographic, metrical, morphological, dental and pathological aspects of the population are considered, and compared with contemporary East Anglian groups. In general the skeletal remains of people buried in this cemetery suggest that they were similar in appearance to other groups in the region. Demographically, they were unusual in having a greater number of women than men, but this may be due to the fact that the entire cemetery was not excavated. Non-metric traits also suggested a general similarity amongst East Anglian Saxon groups, and possible family groups were identified within the cemetery. Dental and pathological lesions produced patterns similar to those occurring in other Saxon groups, although the prevalence of cribra-orbitalia was relatively high at this site and may suggest a diet deficient in iron. Physical stress particularly affected the spines and feet/ankles of the people in this group, and it was suggested that this may be related to occupation and environmental factors. A number of interesting pathologies were observed, including a possible case of tuberculosis of the wrist and a fractured hip.

Report Number:
56/1996
Series:
AML Reports (New Series)
Pages:
97
Keywords:
Human Bone Human Remains

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