CALVERT STREET, NORWICH, NORFOLK (840N): PLANT REMAINS FROM LATE SAXON TO EARLY MEDIEVAL DEPOSITS

Author(s): P Murphy

A buried soil on terrace sand and gravel beneath a Late Saxon rampart showed evidence of waterlogging, and an associated defensive ditch produced waterlogged macrofossil assemblages, virtually devoid of domestic refuse, indicating development of annual weed vegetation and a Bidentetea-type community. There is evidence for heathland vegetation in adjacent areas. An early medieval kiln and pit produced charred cereal assemblages relating to the processing of batches of prime grain, mostly oats and barley : probably grain-drying prior to milling. An early medieval latrine pit contained mainly residues from weed-contaminated wholemeal grain foods (apparently of oats) with some remains of flax, apple and elderberries. The significance of the results in relaxation to local topography and urban development is discussed.

Report Number:
67/1991
Series:
AML Reports (New Series)
Pages:
11
Keywords:
Plant Remains

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