This browser is not fully supported by Historic England. Please update your browser to the latest version so that you get the best from our website.

Record Sites and Memories of the First World War

Register online to volunteer to discover and record evidence of the remains of the First World War (WW1, WWI, or World War One) in your local area. Use our toolkit for PCs, mobiles and tablets to upload your evidence directly to local Historic Environment Records. Your work will be authenticated and the results published.

The Council for British Archaeology (CBA) is working with Historic England and other partners on this community project to bring together the local findings of volunteers from around the United Kingdom.

Contribute to a record that will be used by generations to come:

  • to understand the legacy of the First World War on our landscape and consciousness
  • to inform planning decisions and help safeguard First World War remains for future generations

Dan Snow and Stephen Fisher standing in moorland with landrovers in background.
CBA President Dan Snow and archaeologist Stephen Fisher create the first record for the Council for British Archaeology’s Home Front Legacy project.

Help write this chapter of our history

Compared to what we know about Tudor, Elizabethan or Georgian buildings, the heritage of the First World War in England is a blank chapter… we're asking the public to help us put this right.

Wayne Cocroft Senior Investigator Historic England

For example in late 2013, the remains of a First World War practice battlefield was discovered on heathland in Gosport, Hampshire. The size of 17 football pitches, with two sets of opposing trench systems and a No Man's Land between, it was used for training troops before they were sent to the Front.

Remains of a First World War rubbish dump at Cannock Chase training camp, Staffordshire.
Remains of a First World War rubbish dump at Cannock Chase training camp, Staffordshire. Apparently insignificant items can tell us a lot about camp life. These are fragments of an Anzora bottle of hair tonic, much favoured by New Zealand troops who were stationed here in the war. © Wayne D Cocroft

What will you discover?

With your help we would like to:

Some of today's soldiers in one of the trenches of the newly discovered practice battlefield at Gosport.
Some of today's soldiers in one of the trenches of the newly discovered practice battlefield at Gosport. During the First World War, the town was one of the main departure points for thousands of soldiers setting off for the trenches in Europe, many of whom were taught trench warfare skills here. © Crown copyright 2014
Was this page helpful?