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War Memorials and Remembrance

It is not known how many First World War memorials there are, so widespread was the nation's grief, but there are certainly tens of thousands in Britain. Only around 2,000 free-standing ones are currently listed.  Historic England is committed to doubling this number over the centenary period 2014-2018.

No area of our heritage is more poignant than war memorials. They are found everywhere, and link the tragic impact of world wars with local communities across the land. Every community sent people off to fight and work; virtually all suffered losses, and the absence of the British Empire's 1.1 million dead created a powerful need for monuments. No greater wave of public remembrance has ever happened in history.

Memorials took many forms, and in some places the war was commemorated by dedicated parks and gardens, village halls, tree planting, church lychgates and playing fields.

Now that the last veterans of the 1914-1918 conflict have died, it is left to future generations to keep the memories fresh, with communities taking an ever-greater interest in their local memorials.

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War Memorials

Please click on the gallery images to enlarge.

  • Detail from Liverpool Cenotaph
  • Detail from Royal Artillery Memorial
  • Detail of S.E.5 aeroplane from Captain Albert Ball VC Memorial
  • Coventry War Memorial
  • Detail from Exeter Memorial
  • Detail from Waggoners’ Memorial
  • Detail from Rawtenstall Memorial
  • The Chattri
  • Machine Gun Corps Memorial
  • Imperial Camel Corps Memorial
  • Fordington German Prisoners of War Memorial set in grassy bank
  • Bevan's Cement Works Memorial

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