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Safeguarding the Future of Brooklands Racing Circuit

Here in the South East we are campaigning for the future of Brooklands racing circuit, one of motor racing's most important pieces of heritage and you can get involved by having your say on the Conservation Management Plan.

On this page:

Image of a woman sat in a car (Eric Campbell) smiling from the 1919
In 1929 British Racing Driver Violette Cordery and her younger sister Evelyn drove her 4.5 litre four-seat Invicta for 30,000 miles in less than 30,000 minutes taking her around 20 days and 20 hours

A unique place in motor racing history now at risk

This year, the Racing Circuit at Brooklands in Surrey is celebrating its 110th anniversary. This unique site has an amazing history as the home of countless world records and the birth place of the Grand Prix. It even had a pivotal role in both World Wars as the site of major flying training centres and aircraft factories. You can read all about its fascinating past on our blog - 10 Winning Facts about Brooklands Racing Circuit.

At the moment, parts of the circuit are on the Historic England Heritage at Risk Register. Some areas of the site, which has multiple owners and stakeholders, are in reasonable condition. Others are being damaged by trees and scrub, a lack of maintenance and a need for repairs.

Video of Brooklands Race Track from above

 

Taking action to protect Brookland's future

In July, on the 110th anniversary of the first race at Brooklands, Historic England in partnership with Brooklands Museum, Elmbridge Borough Council and Surrey County Council held an event at Brooklands Museum to bring together owners, tenants and neighbouring residents and businesses.

Whilst part of the track sits within Brooklands Museum, other parts are now within residential gardens, public parks and industrial and retail units. Historic England wants to work directly with owners and tenants to improve the overall condition of the circuit. We hope that by bringing together all those who act as guardians or neighbours to this amazing piece of history, we will be able to foster new relationships and take practical steps to improve the condition and maintenance of the site.

We appreciate that many owners may not understand the importance of the site and will not have experience of managing a scheduled monument. So we are providing general guidance on the simple steps needed to maintain the structure and more detailed help where needed.

Together we hope to ensure that the Brooklands Motor Racing Track remains a physical reminder of our engineering, entrepreneurship and enterprise. So that this unique site will be well protected and cherished for another 110 years

Clare Charlesworth, Heritage at Risk lead, South East
A collage of photos from the Brooklands Stakeholder event which includes a general view of the audience, a view of the invitation and the front cover of the new owners guide
Coming together for the future of Brooklands Racing Circuit © Historic England

Have your say

The area around the racing circuit has a high number of listed buildings and is a Conservation Area. Historic England has provided Brooklands Museum with over £30,000 in grant funding for the creation of a Conservation Management Plan which aims to provide information and guidance on best practice to landowners, residents and other stakeholders. The plan will also inform future decision making on proposals affecting the area and make recommendations for projects to ensure the future conservation of the area.

Elmbridge Borough Council is currently consulting on this plan and would welcome any comments. You can have your say by visiting their website.

Image of Brooklands Racing Circuit from above in black and white
Brooklands Racing Circuit as it was in 1926 © Historic England (EPW016858) Britain from Above
Image of the banking of the Brooklands Racing Circuit
The Racing Circuit banks as high as 30ft in places © Historic England
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