Huskisson, Sandon and Bramley-Moore Docks, Sandhills, 1927

Huskisson, Sandon and Bramley-Moore Docks in action, Sandhills, Liverpool 1927 © Historic England EPW018890 Explore more photos
Huskisson, Sandon and Bramley-Moore Docks in action, Sandhills, Liverpool 1927 © Historic England EPW018890 Explore more photos

Everton FC New Stadium

Everton Football Club are proposing to relocate from the historic Goodison Park to a newly built stadium, in a new location. Bramley-Moore dock has been identified as a strong candidate and towards the end of 2018, the club carried out a series of public consultations to gauge public opinion on this proposal.

Historic dockland location

Bramley-Moore dock is one of a series of five linked docks constructed in Liverpool authorised by the 1844 Dock Act; the others are Salisbury, Collingwood, Stanley and Nelson docks. Their construction represented the huge confidence in Liverpool’s thriving economy and its future expansion.

The new docks were designed by Jesse Hartley and demonstrate his unrivalled ability as a dock engineer. They were constructed from huge granite blocks with very fine mortar joints, with the water bodies being connected via locks to allow the easy movement of vast numbers of ships within the port. The complex was accessed from the river via the entrance dock, Salisbury Dock, with its two river gates highlighted by the Victoria Tower (listed Grade II ), a highly distinctive clock tower.

Aerial view of the five linked docks in Liverpool. Bramley-Moore Dock is the fourth one along
Aerial view of the five linked docks in Liverpool. Bramley-Moore Dock is the fourth one along © Historic England

International significance

Bramley-Moore dock, and its sisters, was a fundamental component of the Port of Liverpool ’s global success. It represents the innovations in dock management and construction which the city pioneered under Jesse Hartley’s supervision. Its international significance led to its inclusion within the boundary of the Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City World Heritage Site (WHS) and in the Stanley Dock Conservation Area. Its national importance is further recognised in the dock retaining walls being listed at Grade II on the National Heritage List.

Historic England involvement

Due to the sensitivity of the site, Historic England will become actively engaged with the pre-application process for this scheme in the coming months as one of the main statutory consultees on any future planning application. Our focus will be on the historic environment and the likely implications for it of any new development at Bramley-Moore.

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