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Immortalised: A Design Competition

In Spring 2018, we challenged future thinkers to find new ways of remembering events, people and identities in the public realm.

From the initial open call, ten submissions have been selected to develop their ideas for display in the Immortalised exhibition, due to open in London in late August 2018. Depending on the proposal, these ideas may be 1:1, scaled down, or a representation of the imagined final work.

The ten proposals that have been selected are:

  • Making the invisible visible - Rosalind Franklin by Jim Bond
  • A Long Shadow Over London by Studio Mash
  • The Discarded Children by Kunyalala Ndlovu
  • The Common Chorus - Death and Remembrance Sound by Studio Mash and Sam Morley Design
  • The Long Line by Katrina Porteous
  • Commemorating the Mining Community of the Kent Coalfields by Studio Evans Lane Ltd
  • Contextualising Colston by MSMR Architects
  • Helen Sharman - The First Briton in Space by Kyle Ian Dawney Design Ltd
  • Friction Match - John Walker Commemoration by Stamatis Zografos
  • We Will Be Dead Tings by Abondance Matanda

About the competition

This competition forms an integral part of the Immortalised season, which aims to encourage new thinking around the production, use and appearance of monuments and memorials in public life.

2018 is a particularly significant year for anniversaries in England, with events up and down the country commemorating the end of the First World War and the victory of the Votes for Women campaign. New statues, plaques and memorials are planned to mark these important historical moments, helping bring to the surface previously overlooked stories and individuals. In response - and recognising that artists, architects and designers have always played a key role in shaping our commemorative landscape - we want to explore alternative approaches to public memory in England. What will the monument of the future look like, and who or what should it remember?

In Britain, artists such as Jeremy Deller and Rachel Whiteread have long questioned the form and function of our commemorative practices, while the Fourth Plinth in London has provided a highly visible platform for new approaches to public sculpture. This competition aims to encourage wider participation in such thinking, as well as opening up the debate around who or what should be 'immortalised' today.

Image of the Women of Steel statue in Sheffield which honours the thousands of women from across South Yorkshire who – during the first and the second world wars - took jobs in the factories and steel mills whose male workers were away fighting.
The Women of Steel statue in Sheffield which honours the thousands of women from across South Yorkshire who – during the first and the second world wars - took jobs in the factories and steel mills whose male workers were away fighting. © Copyright Matt Brown via FlickR (creative commons license)

 

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