This browser is not fully supported by Historic England. Please update your browser to the latest version so that you get the best from our website.

Help Find England’s Secret, Unknown or Forgotten Memorials

Where are the street shrines, monuments and murals near you?

Suggest a memorial

England is full of secret, unknown and forgotten memorials from the heroic and sad, to the quirky, inspirational and challenging. They are often poignant reminders of well-loved lives, lost.

Tablet dedicated to Mary Rogers
Memorial to Heroic Self Sacrifice is a public monument in Postman’s Park, in Little Britain, London

Hidden on our streets are murals, shrines, statues and commemorative benches. Can you help us find them?

How you can help

There are imposing monuments to the grand and famous all over the country. But we're seeking photographs and information about England's lesser-known memorials, or those that are well-loved by local communities but unknown nationally.

We also want to know about rituals and activities attached to memorials to keep their stories alive. Each year, flowers are left at the Alan Turing statue in Manchester on his birthday, and there is annual service on the pavement beneath Oliver Cromwell statue in Westminster. Do you know of others?

A memorial shrine at the Cross Bones Graveyard
A memorial shrine at the Cross Bones Graveyard in south London to commemorate ‘the outcast dead’ © ceridwen

The best stories and pictures we receive will be included in our 'Immortalised' exhibition in the autumn. Some of the community memorials you tell us about may also be considered for listing, to protect and champion what's special about them.

Suggest a memorial

'Immortalised' Season

Our hunt is part of the 'Immortalised' Season that will help people explore the country's memorial landscape - who is remembered, who is missing, and why. It will include events, an exhibition, a debate and a design competition.

Debate

'Revere or Remove? The Battle Over Statues, Heritage and History'
Monday 14 May 2018, 7pm, Emmanuel Centre, London

To discuss this and examine the broader cultural conflict beneath, we are partnering with Intelligence Squared to bring together a stellar panel including historian and broadcaster David Olusoga, historian and author Peter Frankopan and the journalist and author Afua Hirsch. The debate will be chaired by Guardian columnist, broadcaster and author, Jonathan Freedland.

Buy your ticket

'Immortalised' Exhibition

3-17 September 2018, The Workshop, 26 Lambeth High St, Lambeth, London SE1 7AG

The exhibition will explore how people are commemorated; responding to the well-documented lack of women, working people and people of colour in England's collection of statues.

immortalised season
Was this page helpful?

Contact

Communications Team

Engagement Group

Memorials Image Gallery

Please click on the gallery images to enlarge.

  • Plug Plot Riot Statue outside the Corn Exchange, Preston
  • Mural on the side of a building in East London commemorating the Battle of Cable Street
  • Camden Square road sign
  • Sculpture of man, woman and child
  • Statue of Jackie Milburn kicking a football
  • Painted mural of musician David Bowie with flowers and tributes laid in front of it.
  • Cross Bones Graveyard plaque and flowers
  • Mural of punk pioneer Joe Strummer
  • Plaque reads: Mary Rogers, stewardess of the Stella, Mar 30 1899. Self sacrificed by giving up her life belt and voluntarily going down in the sinking ship
  • Statue of Dolly Peel
  • Memorial to the Pretoria Pit mining disaster
  • Pit Wheel Monument to Somerset Miners
  • A mural in tribute to actor and comedian Rik Mayall with a person walking past underneath it.
  • Sambo's grave with wooden cross and pebbles with writing on them
  • Statue of two women in overalls
  • The “headscarf revolutionaries” mural in Hull

Related News

Also of interest...

  • The Alan Turing statue at the University of Surrey © Creative Commons/Colin Smith

    Monuments

    Many LGBTQ people have been commemorated across England’s landscape, but not all monuments acknowledge their gender or sexual orientation.