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Entrance graves, standing stones, field systems, settlements and post-medieval breastwork, kelp pit and stone pits on Halangy and Carn Morval Downs, St Mary's

List Entry Summary

This monument is scheduled under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 as amended as it appears to the Secretary of State to be of national importance. This entry is a copy, the original is held by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Name: Entrance graves, standing stones, field systems, settlements and post-medieval breastwork, kelp pit and stone pits on Halangy and Carn Morval Downs, St Mary's

List entry Number: 1013273

Location

The monument may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:

District: Isles of Scilly

District Type: Unitary Authority

Parish: St. Mary's

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: Not applicable to this List entry.

Date first scheduled: 20-Aug-1970

Date of most recent amendment: 16-Nov-1998

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: RSM

UID: 15402

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Monument

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

The Isles of Scilly, the westernmost of the granite masses of south west England, contain a remarkable abundance and variety of archaeological remains from over 4000 years of human activity. The remote physical setting of the islands, over 40km beyond the mainland in the approaches to the English Channel, has lent a distinctive character to those remains, producing many unusual features important for our broader understanding of the social development of early communities. Throughout the human occupation there has been a gradual submergence of the islands' land area, providing a stimulus to change in the environment and its exploitation. This process has produced evidence for responses to such change against an independent time-scale, promoting integrated studies of archaeological, environmental and linguistic aspects of the islands' settlement. The islands' archaeological remains demonstrate clearly the gradually expanding size and range of contacts of their communities. By the post- medieval period (from AD 1540), the islands occupied a nationally strategic location, resulting in an important concentration of defensive works reflecting the development of fortification methods and technology from the mid 16th to the 20th centuries. An important and unusual range of post- medieval monuments also reflects the islands' position as a formidable hazard for the nation's shipping in the western approaches. The exceptional preservation of the archaeological remains on the islands has long been recognised, producing an unusually full and detailed body of documentation, including several recent surveys.

Several types of early field system have been identified from surviving archaeological remains; both regular and irregular field systems are forms known to have been employed in the Isles of Scilly from the Bronze Age to the Roman period (c.2000 BC-AD 400). Regular field systems comprise a collection of field plots defined by boundaries laid out in a consistent manner, along two dominant axes at approximate right angles to each other. The resulting rectilinear fields may vary in size and length:width ratio within the field system. By contrast, collections of field plots that form irregular field systems generally lack conformity of orientation and arrangement. Both forms of field system contain plots bounded by rubble walls or banks, often incorporating edge-set slabs. They may be associated with broadly contemporary settlement sites including stone hut circles and courtyard houses. Some field systems on the Isles of Scilly have a distinctive and rare association whereby certain boundaries directly incorporate or link prehistoric funerary monuments, including some entrance graves. By virtue of their sometimes extensive survival, early field systems may also include a variety of features pertaining to a later date, including Civil War fieldworks and kelp pits. Although no precise figure is available, regular and irregular field systems together account for the great majority of prehistoric field system patterns which survive in over 70 areas of the Isles of Scilly. They provide significant insights into the physical and social organisation of past landscapes and give evidence for the wider context within which other nationally important monuments were constructed.

The monument contains an unusually wide range of inter-related and well-preserved features representing much of the period of human occupation on the Isles of Scilly. The direct association within the monument between prehistoric field systems, entrance graves and standing stones is rare and illustrates the relationship between farming, funerary and ritual land uses among prehistoric communities on the islands. The evidence for the developing form of the field systems and the shift of their settlement focus from the present coastal fringe to the lower slope site within the monument demonstrates well the organisation of settlement and farming activities and the responses precipitated by the rising sea level on Scilly. The settlement on the lower slope of Halangy Down provides an unparalleled breadth of evidence for the nature of Romano-British domestic life in this remote outlier from the Roman Empire. The range of this evidence is increased by the close proximity of the monument to a broadly contemporary group of funerary cists. The courtyard house with which the settlement culminated is also important in the study of that distinctive class of monument, not only in extending their known distribution beyond the Penwith peninsula but also in providing some of the clearest evidence for how these complex buildings developed. Although an area of the settlement was recently excavated, the excavations did not remove most of the latest structural elements and confirmed along its edges the surface evidence that other parts of the settlement survive beyond the excavated area. Consequently the structural sequence remains largely intact, even within the excavated area, preserving earlier buried features. The excavations have indicated a wealth of archaeological information embodied within the hillwash deposits, buried land surfaces and structures that will survive in those adjacent unexcavated sectors of the settlement. Later activities within the area of the monument's field systems have produced several features of importance in their own right. Among these, the Civil War breastwork beside Toll's Porth survives substantially intact, despite some encroachment from the coastal cliff. Together with the nearby batteries, the breastwork forms part of an inter-related complex of surviving fieldworks which defended the northern approach to the strategically important military centre on The Garrison, which lies to the south west of Hugh Town, thereby showing well the role and disposition of fieldworks. The kelp pit within the monument also survives well and, together with the evidence for stone-robbing and quarrying, illustrates the sequence of more recent activities practised on this coastal margin.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

The monument includes contiguous prehistoric to Roman period regular and irregular field systems, laid out over several phases and extending along the coastal slopes of Halangy Down and Carn Morval Down on north west St Mary's in the Isles of Scilly. Within and adjacent to these field systems, the monument also contains earlier, contemporary and later features. These include two prehistoric entrance graves on Halangy Down; one, known as `Bant's Carn', is sited on the south west crest of the Down, the other is located at the foot of the same slope. A prehistoric standing stone stands at the foot of the north west slope of Halangy Down and another now lies flat on the lower slope within a later settlement on the Down's south west edge. The field systems incorporate prehistoric to Roman settlement sites. Two hut circles are recorded in the Halangy Down field system, while among the field boundaries on Carn Morval Down are several levelled stances also typical of prehistoric house sites. Later settlement is concentrated on the lower slope at the south west edge of Halangy Down where, on the prehistoric terraces, is a complex of round and ovoid houses with numerous ancillary features. The sequence of these buildings extends into the Roman period and culminates in a multi-roomed building called a courtyard house. This embodies many features of the neighbouring structures and is arranged with various rooms leading off a small courtyard, all contained within a massive enclosing wall and entered via a narrow passage. Much later features within the monument include a length of defensive bank and ditch, called a breastwork, behind the coastal cliff below Carn Morval Down and dating to the English Civil War. Further south west is a stone-lined hollow called a kelp pit, used to burn seaweed for soda-ash manufacture, an industry current during the late 17th-early 19th centuries. The coastal slope of Carn Morval Down also includes a number of small quarry pits worked during the 19th century. The Bant's Carn entrance grave on the crest of Halangy Down, the later prehistoric to Roman settlement site on the slope below it, and the field system between and north east of them, up to the modern fence and wall to the north east and south east respectively, form a monument in the care of the Secretary of State. The Bant's Carn entrance grave has a prominent position on the crest of Halangy Down, merging on the east with a prehistoric cultivation terrace running north east along the crest. The south west edge of the entrance grave is overlain by a modern north west-south east field wall. The entrance grave survives with an outer platform around an inner mound containing a slab-built chamber. The levelled outer platform, to 0.6m high, extends to a kerbed edge 13.5m in diameter on the north and east sides of the mound, and is defined by a row of near-contiguous slabs, up to 0.6m high, with intermittent slabs along the northern perimeter. Beyond the platform, a slight slope-break runs 3m beyond the kerb on the north west, converging on the platform at the north east. The platform contains a north east-south west entrance passage, 5m long and 1m wide, meeting the chamber entrance at its inner end. The passage is faced to the north west by large end-set slabs and blocks; on its south east face are traces of smaller slabs, with coursed slabs at the inner end. Within the platform, the entrance grave's ovoid earth and rubble mound measures 8.6m NNW-SSE by 6.2m ENE-WSW. Its edge is flattened in plan to the east and merges with the modern field wall on the south west. Its slightly domed upper surface rises up to 1.5m above the platform, with near-vertical edges faced by coursed slabs. Within the mound is the ENE-WSW slab-built chamber, its ENE entrance meeting the platform's passage at a slight angle. The chamber is 5.25m long, 1.5m high and up to 1.6m wide, tapering slightly to each end with the entrance constricted by slabs, called portal stones, projecting in from each side. The chamber has walls of large coursed slabs and a single large slab closes the inner, WSW, end. The chamber is roofed by four large slabs, called capstones, up to 2.5m long, laid side by side and spanning the chamber width. The capstones and the upper walling of the chamber project to 0.5m above the mound's upper surface. The eastern capstone and southern portal stone were re-set in 1970 after being displaced; limited excavation around the portal stone produced decorated prehistoric pottery fragments, similar to pottery recovered from the inner end of the entrance passage in 1899 by the antiquary Bonsor. Bonsor's excavation also revealed four piles of cremated human bone at the western end of the chamber floor. The other entrance grave is 110m NNW of Bant's Carn, at the foot of the slope. This entrance grave also adjoins a substantial prehistoric terrace, running north east-south west along the foot of the slope and crossing the south east side of the entrance grave. The terrace rises over 3.5m high, faced in places by coursed slabs, as are apparent where it crosses the entrance grave. The entrance grave is visible as a `D'-shaped earth and rubble mound projecting 8m from the foot of the terrace and measuring 10m north east- south west. The mound rises to a flattened top, up to 2.25m high, with the terrace rising a further 1.5m on the south east. Traces of a slab-built kerb are detectable along the mound's west and north periphery. The mound contains a north east-south west chamber, at least 6.2m long and 1m high, tapering in width from 1.2m at its inner south west end, to 0.45m at the north east limit of intact walling. It has coursed rubble and block walls and an edge-set slab closes the south west end. The north east end of the chamber is partly disrupted by recent disturbance. Two capstones survive, up to 1.5m long and 1.3m wide, over the south west of the chamber, together with a projecting fragment of a third. Excavation in the chamber in 1929 produced a quantity of pottery and a pig's jawbone. Located 200m north east of the latter entrance grave along the foot of the Halangy Down slope, the monument's northern prehistoric standing stone survives as a massive erect slab of smoothly weathered granite measuring 1.75m high by 1m wide and 0.7m thick, of oval section. It stands close to the north of a boundary junction in the prehistoric field systems. A second standing stone now lies flat in an ovoid house in the settlement remains on the south west lower slope of Halangy Down. Uncovered during the settlement's excavation, it was considered to have been built into the house wall from which it later fell. The slender granite slab, 2.2m long and up to 0.55m wide, rises 0.2m above the turf. The exposed slab tapers to a blunt point at the north west. The buried face was largely dressed flat with a rectangular raised area whose upper corners bore sunken circular motifs. The prehistoric field systems extend over 7.95ha of the largely north west facing slopes of Halangy and Carn Morval Downs, covering an area measuring 685m north east-south west by up to 195m wide. They are defined by earth- and-rubble banks and terraces. Where they run along the contour a substantial build-up of soil, called a lynchet, has accumulated along the banks' uphill sides. Two blocks of field system are apparent within the overall area, divided in the modern landscape by a sunken track running north-south up the slope between Halangy Down and Carn Morval Down. The south western area of field system extends over 2.92ha of the steep north west slope of Carn Morval Down, from its crest to the coastal cliff. It is visible as a series of heavily lynchetted banks, generally 1m high and 5m-20m apart, roughly following the contour and frequently wavering to avoid irregularities on the slope. The lynchets form short, discontinuous lengths, often linked by curved banks to neighbouring lynchets at their ends. Some lynchets have a small levelled area behind their crest, considered typical of early settlement sites. Near the present coastal edge, this pattern alters on the gentler lower slope. There, at least three curving walls rise obliquely from the coastal cliff to define small rounded plots, up to 0.08ha in extent. The north eastern field system covers 5.03ha of the Halangy Down slope, from its crest to its foot. This field system displays several phases, basic to all being a series of terraces and lynchetted banks along the contour, mostly in the range 7m-40m apart. In most parts, the ground behind the banks has been artificially levelled to create terraces. The terrace scarps generally rise to 0.75m high but, as noted above, the lowest terrace rises over 3.5m high at the foot of the slope, while the upper terrace, merging with the Bant's Carn entrance grave, rises to 1.5m high. Facing slabs survive along some terrace scarps. Individual terraces survive to 300m long, though most are truncated by subsequent modification. On average, seven or eight terraces are perceptible across any part of the slope. This terracing, undivided, forms the initial phase of field system and still survives, barely modified, over the south west and western margins of the Down. Over most of this area, the terraces are subdivided and in places interrupted by banks across the slope reflecting later modification. These banks create at least 15 small, mostly rectilinear field plots and form a regular field system in the north east 2.25 ha of the overall terraced field system. This regular field system has itself been considered to reflect at least two phases or areas of activity. One occupies the south of the regular field system where terrace subdivisions cross the slope obliquely, east-west, forming a block of at least seven field plots which may have been laid out from the prehistoric settlement focus on the lower slope. North east of this block, the rest of the regular field system contains subdivisions generally running directly downslope, south east-north west to form at least eight more plots. Two hut circles are recorded within the Halangy Down field systems. One is located near the crest of the slope 75m north east of the Bant's Carn entrance grave. It survives with an ovoid levelled internal area, 3.7m north west- south east by at least 2m north east-south west. Recent stone-splitting has displaced a large slab into its interior. Another hut circle has been previously recorded 140m to the north on the lower slope of the Down in an area now obscured beneath dense scrub. The settlement area from which the Halangy Down terraced field system was initially laid out is considered to have been sited on more level ground to the north west, beyond the monument, where the encroaching coastal cliff of Halangy Porth exposes rubble buildings and occupation deposits containing Bronze Age and Iron Age artefacts, with further prehistoric structures known from the fields between this monument and the cliff. Later settlement remains occur within this monument, situated on the lower slope terraces at the south west edge of Halangy Down. Excavations between 1935 and 1971 revealed a sequence of structures modified and replaced over roughly 500 years from the later Iron Age to the Roman period. This settlement complex extends over at least 50m along the slope by 30m wide, spanning four narrow terraces. The early phases in the settlement include oval or rounded houses ranging from 7.5m by 5.1m to 7m by 6.75m internally. They are defined by a thick rubble wall, faced by slabs and uncoursed rubble, and surviving to 1m high and from 0.9m-3.8m wide. Thickened walling in most buildings incorporates small storage chambers, 1m-2m in diameter, with a constricted opening to the house interior. The houses have one or sometimes two entrances, formed as faced passages up to 2.2m wide through the wall. Large upright slabs sometimes mark the corners of entrances and storage chambers. Drainage channels were cut in the underlying subsoil and narrow drain cuts, mostly stone-lined and covered, passed through and beside wall footings. One house contained a paved hearth defined by small slabs and traces of paving were found in an entrance passage. At least six houses of this form are evident. Two occupy adjoining terraces in the north east of the settlement and another, now overlain by later structures, is located near the centre of the settlement. A north east-south west row of three more houses extends along the lower terraces at the west of the settlement. The central and south western houses adjoin and are considered to be broadly contemporary. The south western house also contains the relocated, recumbent, standing stone described above. This house underwent considerable enlargement by adding a subrectangular annexe, 5.2m north west- south east by 4m wide internally, defined by a slab-faced wall and containing a narrow entrance passage with threshold and door-pivot slabs where it meets the annexe interior. The final phase in the settlement is a large multi-roomed courtyard house occupying the south east of the settlement area. It contains many features of the other houses in the settlement: each of its rooms resembles one of those neighbouring houses, whose occupation partly overlapped that of the courtyard house. The courtyard house is 27m long by up to 14.5m wide overall and results from several episodes of alteration, addition and contraction of use. Its overall plan contains three internal rooms to the north east, south east and south of an inner courtyard. The oval or round rooms range internally from 7.75m by 5.8m to 3.25m in diameter and, with the courtyard, were formed within a broad all-enclosing outer rubble wall, up to 3.5m wide and rising over 1m high on its downhill side. Except where it merges with an adjoining terrace scarp, the wall has uncoursed rubble facing including large slabs and boulders up to 2m long and 1m high, and the courtyard's western wall is strengthened by a broad rubble buttress against its outer side. Prominent end-set slabs mark most entrances to rooms, to the courtyard and to storage chambers in the wall thicknesses of the north east room and the courtyard. Sanded floors were noted in several internal areas, together with stone-lined drains and paved areas in the rooms and courtyard. In the south east room, a low, straight wall of edge- set slabs crosses the south east sector, which was then further subdivided into three small areas 1m-1.3m wide, the southern area occupying a blocked former entrance to the room. This room also has a small slab-edged hearth, 0.6m diameter, overlying a drain. The southern room was blocked off and partly demolished during the life of the courtyard house. The courtyard measures 6.5m north west-south east by up to 6m north east-south west, with a north western area partitioned off by edge-set slabs. The east side of the courtyard was cobbled while deeper made-up ground on the west had layers of paving patched with cobbles and millstone fragments. The courtyard house was entered through a curved passage, 4.5m long, extending from the south west corner of the courtyard and partly paved by slabs covering a drain from the south east room. Excavations at this settlement produced many artefacts, including Iron Age pottery, local and imported Romano-British pottery and some early post-Roman pottery. Stone implements included flint and quartz tools, a slate spindle- whorl and disc, several millstones and part of a mould-stone for casting metal dishes. Metal finds included bronze brooches and fragments of iron and iron slag, the latter taken to indicate limited iron processing here. A large midden beside the north west wall of the courtyard house produced economic evidence: most of the heap comprised limpet shells, used either directly as food or indirectly as bait. Other components included bones of fish, cattle, sheep, pig and horse. In the mid-17th century, the Civil War breastwork was built behind the coastal cliff along the southern end of Toll's Porth, covering these low cliffs against landing parties. It is visible as an earth bank up to 2.5m wide, 0.4m high on its inner side and 0.6m high on the outer side. The outer side is almost vertical with traces of beach cobble facing. The landward side of the bank is accompanied by a ditch, up to 1.75m wide and 0.3m deep. The breastwork survives over 50m, truncated at each end by cliff erosion. Beyond the south west end of the breastwork is a small slab-lined hollow called a kelp pit, in which seaweed was burnt to produce soda-ash, an industry which lasted from 1684 to 1835. The kelp pit is 2.5m from the cliff edge and is visible as a circular hollow, 1.4m in diameter and 0.6m deep, shaped as an inverted truncated cone. The sides are lined by slabs, up to 0.4m across, laid edge to edge, with a single slab lying flat on the base. Nineteenth century stone extraction within the monument has produced at least 15 small quarry pits, mostly on the Carn Morval Down slope, which contain debris bearing drilled splitting holes characteristic of stone splitting after AD 1800. Quarrying hollows are also evident on terrace edges beside the settlement complex on Halangy Down. A major stimulus for this extensive 19th century stone extraction was the construction of the new pier at Hughtown during 1835-1838, much of its stone being recorded as shipped down from along the western coastline of St Mary's. Beyond the monument, prehistoric settlement remains in the Halangy Porth cliff have already been noted. Bronze Age funerary cairns are located on the Carn Morval Down plateau, south east of the monument. A prehistoric standing stone, the Long Rock, is located 155m north east of the monument and prehistoric field systems and settlements extend along the north east coast of St Mary's from 160m north of the monument. West of the Halangy Down settlement is a cemetery of small funerary chambers called cists, of a form typical of the Romano-British period in Scilly. The nearest cist is recorded 12m west of the monument. The breastwork in this monument is part of an extensive series of surviving Civil War defensive works around the coast of St Mary's including gun batteries and a platform on Carn Morval Point, 140m south west of the monument, and a battery on the headland between Toll's Porth and Halangy Porth, 50m west of the monument. The latter battery gave a field of fire over the bay fringed by the breastwork included in this monument. All English Heritage notices, plinths, signposts, gate, stile, fences and fittings and the modern gravel surface in the chamber of Bant's Carn, together with the surfaces of the modern tracks, all post and wire fences and gates, the beehives and the notices around the television mast enclosure are excluded from the scheduling, although the ground beneath all these features is included.

MAP EXTRACT The site of the monument is shown on the attached map extract. It includes a 2 metre boundary around the archaeological features, considered to be essential for the monument's support and preservation.

Selected Sources

Books and journals
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, Ancient Scilly, (1974)
Ashbee, P, The chambered Tombs on St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, (1963), 9-18
Grigson, G, The Scilly Isles, (1977)
O'Neil, BH St J, Ancient Monuments of the Isles of Scilly, (1949)
O'Neil, BH St J, Ancient Monuments of the Isles of Scilly, (1960)
Over, L, The Kelp Industry in Scilly, (1987)
Sharpe, A, The Minions Area Archaeological Survey and Management (Volume 2), (1989)
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Thomas, C, Exploration of a Drowned Landscape, (1985)
Thomas, C, Exploration of a Drowned Landscape, (1985)
Thomas, C, Exploration of a Drowned Landscape, (1985)
Thomas, C, Exploration of a Drowned Landscape, (1985)
Thomas, C, Exploration of a Drowned Landscape, (1985)
Thomas, C, Exploration of a Drowned Landscape, (1985)
Thomas, C, Exploration of a Drowned Landscape, (1985)
Thomas, C, Exploration of a Drowned Landscape, (1985)
Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Halangy Porth, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, Excavations 1975-76, , Vol. 22, (1983), 3-46
Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Halangy Porth, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, Excavations 1975-76, , Vol. 22, (1983), 3-46
Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Halangy Porth, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, Excavations 1975-76, , Vol. 22, (1983), 3-46
Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Halangy Porth, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, Excavations 1975-76, , Vol. 22, (1983), 3-46
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Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Halangy Porth, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, Excavations 1975-76, , Vol. 22, (1983), 3-46
Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Halangy Porth, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, Excavations 1975-76, , Vol. 22, (1983), 3-46
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Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Bant's Carn, St Mary's: An Entrance Grave Restored And Reconsidered, , Vol. 15, (1976), 11-26
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Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Studies' in George Bonsor: An Archaeological Pioneer From Spain On Scilly, , Vol. 8, (1980), 53-62
Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Excavations at Halangy Down, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, 1965-66, , Vol. 5, (1966), 20-27
Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Excavations at Halangy Down, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, 1965-66, , Vol. 5, (1966), 20-27
Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Excavations at Halangy Down, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, 1965-66, , Vol. 5, (1966), 20-27
Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Excavations at Halangy Down, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, 1965-66, , Vol. 5, (1966), 20-27
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Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Excavations at Halangy Down, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, 1969-70, , Vol. 9, (1970), 69-76
Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Excavations at Halangy Down, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, 1969-70, , Vol. 9, (1970), 69-76
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Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Excavations on Halangy Down, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, 1967-68, (1968), 24-32
Ashbee, P, 'Cornish Archaeology' in Excavations on Halangy Down, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, 1967-68, (1968), 24-32
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Other
AM7 & Ancient Monuments Terrier for SI 350,
AM7 and Ancient Monuments Terrier for SI 350,
Ancient Monuments Terrier for Scilly County Monument No.350,
consulted 1993, AM7 and Ancient Monuments Terrier for Scilly County Monument 350,
consulted 1993, AM7 and Ancient Monuments Terrier for SI 350,
consulted 1993, Parkes, C & Ratcliffe, J/CAU, AM 107 for Scilly SMR entry PRN 7443, (1988)
consulted 1993, Parkes, C, AM 107 for Scilly SMR entry PRN 7441, (1988)
consulted 1993, Parkes, C, AM 107 for Scilly SMR entry PRN 7442.02, (1988)
consulted 1993, Parkes, C, AM 107 for Scilly SMR entry PRN 7446, (1988)
consulted 1993, Parkes, C/CAU, AM 107 for Scilly SMR entry PRN 7442.01, (1988)
consulted 1993, Parkes, C/CAU, AM 107 for Scilly SMR entry PRN 7442.02, (1988)
consulted 1993, Parkes, C/CAU, AM 107 for Scilly SMR entry PRN 7442.03, (1988)
consulted 1993, Parkes, C/CAU, AM 107 for Scilly SMR entry PRN 7444, (1988)
consulted 1993, Parkes, C/CAU, AM 107 for Scilly SMR entry PRN 7490, (1988)
consulted 1993, Ratcliffe, J, AM 107 for Scilly SMR entry PRN 7450, (1988)
consulted 1993, Ratcliffe, J/CAU, AM 107 for Scilly SMR entry PRN 7449, (1988)
DOE/HBMC, Ancient Monuments Terrier for Scilly County Monument No.350,
Release 01; pp 2-3, Raymond, F, EH Monument Class Description: Courtyard Houses, (1988)
Saunders, A D, AM7 scheduling documentation for SI 782, 1970, consulted 1993
Title: 1:10000 Ordnance Survey Map: SV 91 SW Source Date: 1980 Author: Publisher: Surveyor:
Title: 1:2500 Ordnance Survey Map, SV 8715 Source Date: 1980 Author: Publisher: Surveyor:
Title: 1:2500 Ordnance Survey Maps: SV 9012 & SV 9112 Source Date: 1980 Author: Publisher: Surveyor:
Title: 1:2500 Ordnance Survey Maps; SV 9012 & SV 9112 Source Date: 1980 Author: Publisher: Surveyor:

National Grid Reference: SV 90958 12302

Map

Map
© Crown Copyright and database right 2017. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
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