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Fiddleford Manor

List Entry Summary

This monument is scheduled under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 as amended as it appears to the Secretary of State to be of national importance. This entry is a copy, the original is held by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Name: Fiddleford Manor

List entry Number: 1013372

Location

The monument may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County: Dorset

District: North Dorset

District Type: District Authority

Parish: Sturminster Newton

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: Not applicable to this List entry.

Date first scheduled: 09-Oct-1981

Date of most recent amendment: 11-Apr-1996

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: RSM

UID: 22971

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Monument

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Medieval manorial settlements, comprising small groups of houses with associated gardens, yards and paddocks, supported communities devoted primarily to agriculture, and acted as the foci for manorial administration. Although the sites of many of these settlements have been occupied continuously down to the present day, many others declined in size or were abandoned at some time during the medieval and post-medieval periods, particularly during the 14th and 15th centuries. The reasons for desertion were varied but often reflected declining economic viability, changes in land- use such as enclosure or emparkment, or population fluctuations as a result of widespread epidemics such as the Black Death. As a consequence of their abandonment, these settlements are frequently undisturbed by later occupation and contain well-preserved archaeological deposits, providing information on the diversity of medieval settlement patterns and farming economy, and on the structure and changing fortunes of manorial communities.

Fiddleford Mill House survives well as a good example of its class. The portion contained within the monument is unusual in that much of what can be seen represents the original 14th century building: the timber roof is largely original and many of the interior features have been retained. The development of the building from the 14th century is known from both archaeological survey and from a detailed documentary record. Both have been the subject of investigation by the Royal Commission for Historic Monuments (England) and English Heritage. The monument is on display to the public.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

The monument includes the hall, two storey solar and the remains of the west range of Fiddleford Mill House, a manorial residence of 14th century date situated on level ground overlooking the River Stour to the west. The standing buildings include part of the hall and the solar. To the east and west of the standing buildings are remains representing the west range and an extension of the hall. These have been demolished but foundations remain visible as slight earthworks. A 16th century extension of the building to the north is now inhabited and as such is not included in the scheduling. Both the monument and the 16th century extension to the north are Listed Grade I. The 14th century building took the form of a large hall associated with a chamber block of two floors at the western end. Service rooms occupied the remainder of the ground floor, above which was a large chamber or `solar' which was probably accessed via an external staircase located on either the southern or western walls. During conservation work, a wall painting was uncovered on the northern wall of the solar; this is thought to represent the Angel Gabriel and to date from the 14th century. Both the hall and the solar are composed of coursed rubble walls of Greensand and Marnhull limestone and were originally covered by a timber roof. The solar retains original roof timbers and is slated. The roof of the hall has been much altered, although it still retains a smoke louvre which originally served an open hearth on the floor; the roof of the hall is now tiled. To the east and west of the original 14th century building were two extensions added during the 17th century. The eastern extension was to the hall; that to the west was an additional range of rooms. Both have been demolished but foundations are visible as slight earthworks. It is likely that the hall and solar were built for William Latimer, when the manor of Fiddleford passed to him around 1355. During the 16th century, the house belonged to the White family and extensive re-modelling was undertaken by Thomas and Ann White (1539-1555). During this period, the hall was rebuilt in finely worked stone, a new fireplace was constructed in the south wall and a porch and great bay or oriel window were added. The old roof was dismantled and re-erected in order to insert the great beams to support a flat moulded plaster ceiling, which has since been removed. The service rooms were removed from the ground floor and an internal staircase added to provide access to the solar, which was fitted with new windows and a new chimney-piece. There were also extensions to the western wing and an eastern wing was added to the new hall. During the later 16th or early 17th centuries, a screen and gallery were added to the western end of the hall, although only the gallery front now survives. The house remained in the White family until at least the time of Charles I. After the Restoration the house was bought by Sir Thomas Freke and it was retained by his descendants, the Pitt-Rivers family. During the 18th century the hall was shortened and the porch and much of the southern wall demolished, although a new fireplace and ceiling were added. By 1956 the 18th century house had been demolished and the remainder of the 14th century structure had become derelict. By 1962 only the 16th century northern wing remained habitable and the 14th century part of the house passed into State care. Excluded from the scheduling are all fence posts and gates relating to the modern field boundaries, although the underlying ground is included. Also excluded are all modern fixtures and fittings within the building, although all original timberwork and masonry is included.

MAP EXTRACT The site of the monument is shown on the attached map extract.

Selected Sources

Books and journals
Historical Monuments in the County of Dorset: Volume I, (1970), 271-2
Historical Monuments in the County of Dorset: Volume I, (1970), 272
Historical Monuments in the County of Dorset: Volume I, (1970), 272
Historical Monuments in the County of Dorset: Volume I, (1970), 272
Historical Monuments in the County of Dorset: Volume I, (1970), 271
Historical Monuments in the County of Dorset: Volume I, (1970), 272
Historical Monuments in the County of Dorset: Volume I, (1970), 272
Historical Monuments in the County of Dorset: Volume I, (1970), 272
Historical Monuments in the County of Dorset: Volume I, (1970), 272
Historical Monuments in the County of Dorset: Volume I, (1970), 272
English Heritage, , Fiddleford Mill House
Other
Mention demolition of part of house, English Heritage, Fiddleford Mill House,
Mention demolition of part of house, English Heritage, Fiddleford Mill House,
Mention demolition of part of house, English Heritage, Fiddleford Mill House,
Mention demolition of part of house, English Heritage, Fiddleford Mill House,
Mention demolition of part of house, English Heritage, Fiddleford Mill House,
Mention demolition of part of house, English Heritage, Fiddleford Mill House,
Mention demolition of part of house, English Heritage, Fiddleford Mill House,
Mention initial composure of building,
Mention insertion of gallery in Hall, English Heritage, Fiddleford Manor, (1987)
Mention 'T' shaped plan,

National Grid Reference: ST 80080 13570

Map

Map
© Crown Copyright and database right 2017. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2017. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
Use of this data is subject to Terms and Conditions.

The above map is for quick reference purposes only and may not be to scale. For a copy of the full scale map, please see the attached PDF - 1013372 .pdf

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This copy shows the entry on 23-Nov-2017 at 12:01:57.

End of official listing