CHURCH OF ST DUNSTAN IN THE WEST (INCLUDING ATTACHED SUNDAY SCHOOL)

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
I
List Entry Number:
1064663
Date first listed:
04-Jan-1950
Date of most recent amendment:
23-Mar-1998
Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST DUNSTAN IN THE WEST (INCLUDING ATTACHED SUNDAY SCHOOL), FLEET STREET EC4

Map

Ordnance survey map of CHURCH OF ST DUNSTAN IN THE WEST (INCLUDING ATTACHED SUNDAY SCHOOL)
© Crown Copyright and database right 2019. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2019. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
Use of this data is subject to Terms and Conditions.

The above map is for quick reference purposes only and may not be to scale. For a copy of the full scale map, please see the attached PDF - 1064663.pdf

The PDF will be generated from our live systems and may take a few minutes to download depending on how busy our servers are. We apologise for this delay.

This copy shows the entry on 13-Dec-2019 at 05:48:54.

Location

Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST DUNSTAN IN THE WEST (INCLUDING ATTACHED SUNDAY SCHOOL), FLEET STREET EC4

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:
Greater London Authority
District:
City and County of the City of London (London Borough)
National Grid Reference:
TQ 31229 81172

Details

TQ 3181 SW FLEET STREET, EC4 (North side) 627/7/75 Church of St Dunstan in the West (including attached Sunday School) 04.01.50

GV I

Parish church and attached Sunday School incorporating church vestry. Church 1830-33 on site of a church dating from c1170, incorporating monuments from the earlier church and statues and masonry from the nearby Ludgate, demolished in 1760 for road widening. Architect John Shaw Senior completed after his death by his son John. Sunday School of 1839 by Shaw. Church is an octagonal, Gothic design in yellow brick with stone dressings. Ketton stone tower to south of three stages with ogee to entrance arch, buttresses and crockets. Top stage has triple arched windows with cinquefoil lights. Above this is slender octagonal stone lantern. Immediately to the right of the south door is a memorial tablet to Izaac Walton erected in 1895. Attached to the east of the church is a bracketed clock of 1671 by Thomas Harris brought to the church in 1935. Above this in a wooden Ionic aedicule are two figures of men wielding clubs to strike bells either side of a false door. Below this is the Northcliffe Memorial of 1930 with obelisk designed by Lutyens and bronze bust by Lady Scott. Plaster vault to interior of church over iron structure with pointed plaster tunnel vaults with transverse ribs, the four diagonal recesses also with rib vaults and main vault star-ribbed above a clerestorey of eight identical windows. Chancel to north. Entrances to west from Clifford's Inn Passage and east (vestry). Fittings of the 1830s by Shaw include pews, font and pulpit with linenfold panelling. Altar surround incorporates early C16 Flemish woodwork. Stalls have fragments of late C17 pierced carving. Organ by Joseph Robson 1834, in a case probably designed by John Shaw. North west window to Izaac Walton by Kempe behind the Iconostasis of c1860 brought from Antim Monastery Bucharest. Wrought iron sword rest of frame type of 1745.Monuments include a C16 brass and figurative tombs, busts and wall tablets dating from the C16 to the mid C19, mainly preserved from the previous church on the site. Attached to the east is the Sunday School with a plaque with the inscription "St Dunstan in the West AD 1839". Stone faced with parapet with two small ball finials with three panels below, the centre one containing the inscription. Centre has aedicule with decorated pilasters and swansneck pediment of c1667 from the Ludgate demolished in 1760. In the central niche is a statue of Queen Elizabeth I in state robes with orb and sceptre, probably made in 1586 by William Kerwin and removed from the Ludgate. Beneath is a round-headed arch with strapwork motif above and beneath the arch in the vestry porch are three decayed stone statues on stone plinths said to represent King Lud and his sons, also removed from the Ludgate.

[See Pevsner BOE London 1: The City pp 214-217 and p501.]



Listing NGR: TQ3122981180

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
199471
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 03 Sep 2000
Reference: IOE01/01879/15
Rights: Copyright IoE Mrs Mary Winch. Source Historic England Archive
Archive image, may not represent current condition of site.
To view this image please use Firefox, Chrome, Safari, or Edge.

Your Contributions

Do you know more about this entry?

The following information has been contributed by users volunteering for our Enriching The List project. For small corrections to the List Entry please see our Minor Amendments procedure.

The information and images below are the opinion of the contributor, are not part of the official entry and do not represent the official position of Historic England. We have not checked that the contributions below are factually accurate. Please see our terms and conditions. If you wish to report an issue with a contribution or have a question please email [email protected].