This browser is not fully supported by Historic England. Please update your browser to the latest version so that you get the best from our website.

WING OF FORMER BARTON OLD HALL, CIRCA 20 METRES SOUTH OF OLD HALL FARMHOUSE

List Entry Summary

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

Name: WING OF FORMER BARTON OLD HALL, CIRCA 20 METRES SOUTH OF OLD HALL FARMHOUSE

List entry Number: 1073560

Location

WING OF FORMER BARTON OLD HALL, CIRCA 20 METRES SOUTH OF OLD HALL FARMHOUSE, JEPPS LANE

The building may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County: Lancashire

District: Preston

District Type: District Authority

Parish: Barton

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: II*

Date first listed: 11-Nov-1966

Date of most recent amendment: 13-Jan-1986

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: LBS

UID: 185859

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Building

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

SD 53 NW BARTON JEPPS LANE

4/12 Wing of former Barton Old Hall, c.20 metres south of Old Hall Farmhouse (formerly listed as Barn and Shippons at Barton Old Hall) 11.11.1966 GV II*

Detached wing of former Barton Old Hall manor house,now used as barn and shippon. Probably C16 or earlier; altered . Timber framed, with C18 and early C20 brick cladding, slate roof. Rectangular 6-bay plan. Two storeys; the present entrances are on the east side (assumed to be the front) but there is now no evidence of the position of the original openings. The brick walling of the front and rear is interrupted by planks fixed to the rails and posts of the internal structure to indicate their position (posts rising from c.2 metres above ground), and at 1st floor of the rear of the 5th bay is a 3-light timber window frame (sill, moulded mullions and head). To the rear of the 2nd bay just the head of a similar window survives. The north gable wall (covered at ground floor by a wooden lean-to shed) has a high stone plinth, the timber frame of a 32-light mullion and transom window (no evidence of former glazing visible, and said to be ex-situ), and at 1st floor in the centre the remains of a 4-light window flanked by chevron-pattern framing which rises to the tie beam, the gable above concealed by boarding. The south gable wall is concealed at ground floor by an attached bungalow, but the tie beam and chevron-framing of the gable are visible. Interior: almost complete survival of original timbering with decorative treatment comparable in quality with the principal manor houses of this county (eg Samlesbury Hall): the principal posts (at ground floor) and main joists have stepped (or interrupted) cyma recta moulding, the floor joists ogee-shaped moulding; at 1st floor king post roof trusses and open trusses alternate, with straight bracing to 2 pairs of butt purlins, which have the remains of black and white chevron painted decoration; and beneath the open trusses of the 2 bays at each end are the main framing members of ceilings inserted presumably at an early date, with double roll moulding on the soffits. (A brick partition has been inserted in the centre of the 3rd bay at ground floor, and in the middle truss at 1st floor). History: possibly built by Richard Barton, c1532-71, who succeeded to the Barton estate in 1554 and married, 1st, Helen, daughter of Sir Robert Hesketh of Rufford, 2nd, Ann, daughter of Sir Thomas Southworth of Samlesbury c.1556. Purpose of building uncertain because there is no evidence of heating: possibly retainers' hall for occasional use. By tradition Barton Old Hall was said to have been damaged by fire in 1617, by Richard Shuttleworth to avoid the expense of entertaining James I.

Listing NGR: SD5305138199

Selected Sources

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details

National Grid Reference: SD 53051 38199

Map

Map
© Crown Copyright and database right 2018. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2018. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
Use of this data is subject to Terms and Conditions.

The above map is for quick reference purposes only and may not be to scale. For a copy of the full scale map, please see the attached PDF - 1073560 .pdf

The PDF will be generated from our live systems and may take a few minutes to download depending on how busy our servers are. We apologise for this delay.

This copy shows the entry on 25-May-2018 at 10:00:06.

End of official listing