CHURCH OF ST LUKE

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II
List Entry Number:
1084304
Date first listed:
26-Oct-1989
Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST LUKE, KING STREET

Map

Ordnance survey map of CHURCH OF ST LUKE
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Location

Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST LUKE, KING STREET

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
Tameside (Metropolitan Authority)
National Grid Reference:
SJ 94054 97533

Details

SJ 99 NW, 3/140

DUCKINFIELD, KING STREET,

CHURCH OF ST LUKE

II

Anglican parish church. 1889: designed by John Eaton & Sons of Ashton-under-Lyne. Red brick with stone and terracotta dressings and decorative detailing; Welsh slate roof with red cresting tiles. PLAN: nave of six bays with narrow aisles (not registered externally); internal transepts (that to N containing the organ); uninterrupted single-bay chancel with no aisles, and polygonally apsed sanctuary. W. narthex, W bellcote; S baptistry (W bay of nave); SE vestry. EXTERIOR. W. front, a well-managed composition. 3-bay narthex with parapet and regular triple lancets to each bay: central gable with coping; both ends of the narthex are canted with principal entrance to right (depressed doorway arch with blank arcaded tympanum under gable). At the angles (i.e. between W and canted faces of the narthex) are two large buttresses which above the parapet become flying buttresses and connect with the W wall of nave where they receive polygonal turrets, and flank the large 5-light stepped lancet windows under superordinate arch with hood moulds. Nave with sprocketted roof; side walls: each bay with double lancets and continuous label/impost string course. Gabled transepts similarly treated. INTERIOR. Arcades with continuous hood moulds over square-section piers with demi-shafts to E and W only which support the inner order. Transverse arches to aisles set very low. Large and impressive canted, boarded roof to nave; principal over chancel rest on stone carbel shafts. Contemporary fittings of a high Victorian character with much punched tracery to choir stalls, reading desk, and polygonal pulpit (the latter- usually for the date - with Soundboard) altar table and reredos. Decorative tiling throughout.

A good example of a late - C19 church by a little-known architectural practice that did, however, contribute considerably to the townscape of the Ashton and environs, and was well versed in current architectural trends.

Listing NGR: SJ9405497533

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
358717
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 13 Oct 2002
Reference: IOE01/05849/02
Rights: Copyright IoE Mr Michael J. A. Smith. Source Historic England Archive
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