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LADY HOUSE

List Entry Summary

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

Name: LADY HOUSE

List entry Number: 1106072

Location

LADY HOUSE

The building may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County: Devon

District: West Devon

District Type: District Authority

Parish: Drewsteignton

National Park: DARTMOOR

Grade: II

Date first listed: 22-Feb-1967

Date of most recent amendment: Not applicable to this List entry.

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: LBS

UID: 94887

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Building

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

History

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Details

SX 79 SW DREWSTEIGNTON DREWSTEIGNTON

5/92 Lady House

22.2.67 II GV

House, once including a bakery and shop. Early or mid C16 (the earliest document is lease of 1542), with major later C16 and C17 improvements, C18 extension, some late C19 modernisation and renovated circa 1970. Plastered cob on stone rubble footings; stone rubble stacks topped with brick; thatch roof. Plan and devlopment: 3-room-and-through-passage plan house facing south. Unheated inner room at the left (west) end. Hall has a large axial stack backing onto the site of the former passage. The service end room has a projecting front lateral stack. The roofspace is inaccessible and therefore the early development of the house cannot be determined with certainty. Nevertheless it seems likely that the original house was open to the roof from end to end, divided by low partition screens and heated by an open hearth fire. The hall fireplace was probably inserted in the late C16, the service end room fireplace is later and the house was progressively floored from the mid C16 - mid C17. There is evidence that the first inner room chamber jettied into the upper end of the hall but, in the mid C17, when the hall was floored over, the first floor hall-inner room partition was moved back over the ground floor partition. Unheated 1-room plan extension added in C18 at right angles to rear of the inner room, maybe for agricultural or storage purposes. By the late C19 there was a bakery here and a massive bread oven added (or enlarged) in hall fireplace. At this time the inner room was used as the shop. Lower passage partition removed in C20. House and extension are 2 storeys. Exterior: irregular 3-window front of C20 casements with glazing bars. The right end ground floor window has been inserted partly through the service end room stack. A fourth ground floor window, the inner one to the inner room, is blocking the bakery shop doorway. Passage front doorway has a C20 plank door. The large oven housing projects forward to left of the doorway. The roof is gable-ended to left and runs continuously with that of No.1 Church Gate Cottages (q.v) to left. Interior: no carpentry shows in the service end room. The fireplace here is granite with a chamfered lintel but is reduced in width by the front window. Granite ashlar back to the hall fireplace and the oak doorframe from the passage, though partly boxed in, appears to be C17 with an ovolo-moulded surround. In the hall the fireplace is built of granite ashlar with a soffit-chamfered and runout- stopped oak lintel under a granite relieving arch. On the right side is a massive brick bread oven over a proving oven. Stone rubble crosswall at the upper end of the hall may be an original low partition since it contains an early-mid C16 oak shoulder-headed doorframe. Above the crosswall the former jetty joists have been sawn off flush with the crosswall, all that is except the one (with curved end) left supporting the mid C17 soffit-chamfered and scroll-stepped axial beam flooring over the hall. Little of the roof is exposed and the roofspace is inaccessible. Only part of the truss over the upper end of the passage can be seen and it appears to be a true cruck truss and, alongside the passage rear doorway, the foot of the cruck is exposed descending to floor level. The rear block has a roughly-chamfered crossbeam of enormous scantling and the 2-bay roof is carried on an A-frame truss, with a pegged and spiked lap-jointed collar. Lady House is one of the (if not the) earliest surviving houses in the village. Moreover it forms part of an attractive group of listed buildings east of the churchyard. The present owner has researched the documentary history of the property and has a list of the leaseholders from its pre- C20 owner, the church. Also he has a photograph from circa 1900 showing the house with the baker's shop.

Listing NGR: SX7370090873

Selected Sources

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details

National Grid Reference: SX 73700 90873

Map

Map
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End of official listing