CHURCH OF ST LEONARDS

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II*
List Entry Number:
1179067
Date first listed:
29-Jul-1959
Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST LEONARDS, CHURCH LANE

Map

Ordnance survey map of CHURCH OF ST LEONARDS
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Location

Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST LEONARDS, CHURCH LANE

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:
Worcestershire
District:
Malvern Hills (District Authority)
Parish:
Cotheridge
National Grid Reference:
SO 78670 54739

Details

SO 75 SE COTHERIDGE CP CHURCH LANE (east side)

5/25 Church of St Leonards 29.7.59



II*

Parish church. Early C12, altered early C15 and restored in 1684 for Rowland Berkeley. Part plastered sandstone, part brick, tiled roofs; bell tower is timber-framed, part plastered, part weatherboarded with slate roof. 2 bay chancel with former south chapel, now vestry, nave and south tower. South tower Added in C15. 4 stages; lower 2 stages are plastered, upper 2 stages weatherboarded; lower stage has C17 10-light chamfered mullioned window in west wall; south wall faced with tongued and grooved oak planks and has a central pointed arched doorway; C15 planked door with moulded cover strips and wrought iron hinges. Above on the second stage are 2 small lights with a single diagonal mullion. The belfry stage has paired, louvred bell chamber openings and pyramidal roof. Chancel east wall has 2 original pilaster buttresses and C15 diagonal buttress at its southern angle; early C15 east window for 4 cusped lights. South wall has 2 original pilaster buttresses flanked by a C13 cusped lancet to the west, and a C13 2-light window to the east. Nave north elevation has 3 original pilaster buttresses and a C17 diagonal brick buttress; 2 C18 windows with cambered heads and leaded lights set within C12 window openings and a blocked doorway opposing the main southern entrance door. West elevation has C14 corner buttresses and a central original pilaster buttress with a C19 pointed arched window above and C18 windows with cambered heads each side in the original openings; all windows have leaded lights. South elevation has 3 original pilaster buttresses and a C14 buttress at the east end; late C14 3-light window and an original lancet, enclosed by tower. Vestry Built in 1620 as a chapel. Brick in Old English bond. Parapetted gable ends with moulded capings; 3 clasping buttresses to north wall; square-headed 3-light east window has label mould with returns; planked timber door in west elevation. Interior Wall dividing nave and chancel has a central chancel arch enriched with chevron moulding, on spiral columns decorated with a beaded spiral band and having pointed scalloped capitals and moulded bases; on either side of the arch are window openings, the north window has a semi-circular head and the south window a 4-centred arched head; both windows have leaded lights. The chancel roof is probably C14 having a central king-post and swept wind-braces; nave has a barrel vaulted roof and moulded cornice; the vestry roof has a central raking strut truss. The timber-framework of the south tower is constructed at its lower 3 stages around 2 pairs of massive cruck-like blades, which intersect at second stage level;2 very long slightly curved braces cross from first floor to third stage level, intersecting just above the main blades. The wall-frame at the lowest stage is infilled with tongue-and- groove boarding; the second stage is of 2 rows of close-set vertical studding with swept braces; the third stage is of 2 rows of large, rectangular panels having swept and straight braces, totalling 5 panels from sill to wall-plate beneath belfy. The belfy is smaller in section and composed of small square and rectangular panels with straight braces, 3 from the third stage to wall- plate. The interior walls and ceiling of the nave, chancel and chapel are plastered; some of the plaster in the nave has been removed to expose fragments of medieval wall paintings on the north wall and wall above the chancel arch. The chancel has a C17 arched doorway to vestry; C15 and C19 floor tiles; piscina with arched head; a C17 hexagonal oak panelled pulpit and tester; dado of C17 panelling behind altar and box pews made up of similar panelling; late C17 altar rails with turned balusters; 4 wall memorials of mid C19 date, the 3 on the north wall to the Berkeley family. Mid C19 font. C17 painted glass in vestry window of the arms of the Berkeley family with a label and crest of a bear's head, razed and muzzled. At the time of survey (June 1984) the nave and south tower were out of use, apparently due to their deteriorating condition. (VCH, BoE).

Listing NGR: SO7867054739

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
151696
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 20 May 2001
Reference: IOE01/01323/01
Rights: Copyright IoE Mr David South. Source Historic England Archive
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