THE FORMER QUAKER MEETING HOUSE

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
I
List Entry Number:
1202463
Date first listed:
08-Jan-1959
Statutory Address:
THE FORMER QUAKER MEETING HOUSE, THE FRIARY BUILDING, QUAKERS FRIARS, BS31 3DF

Map

Ordnance survey map of THE FORMER QUAKER MEETING HOUSE
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Location

Statutory Address:
THE FORMER QUAKER MEETING HOUSE, THE FRIARY BUILDING, QUAKERS FRIARS, BS31 3DF

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
City of Bristol (Unitary Authority)
National Grid Reference:
ST 59275 73318

Details

This list entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 30/11/2016

ST5973 901-1/40/492

BRISTOL Broadmead QUAKERS FRIARS, The Friary Building The Former Quaker Meeting House

(Formerly listed as The Meeting House, QUAKERS FRIARS) 08/01/59

GV I Former Quaker meeting house. 1747-9. By George Tully. Stonework details designed and supplied by Thomas Paty, also the contractor. Render with limestone dressings and a leaded roof with hipped Welsh slate roof to a Delabole slate lantern. Square open plan. Mid Georgian style. 2 storeys; 3-window range. A symmetrical front with a plat band and moulded, coped parapet, ramped up at the corners. A large, central doorcase has a triple keyed, moulded architrave inscribed 1747, consoles to pediment and a 2-leaf, 8-panel door. Segmental-arched surrounds with sill blocks to flanking 4/8-pane sashes and 3 taller 8/8-pane sashes on the first floor. Similar side elevations each of a 4-window range without doorways. Square lantern has sashes to each face.

INTERIOR: a pedimented inner porch with pilasters and panelled side doors, to a 3x3 bay auditorium, articulated by Doric columns on high octagonal plinths; panelled side galleries to 3 sides between the columns, and keyed, semicircular-arched doorways from the lobby to steps up to them; at the blind W end stood the preacher's desk, in front of a dado and entablature, with stair rails at each end with turned balusters and square newels; central square lantern has a coved ceiling.

FITTINGS: some seating remains in the galleries. The Quakers were established on the site from 1670. An interior of 'noble simplicity' (Ison), restored c1960, with inserted offices. Exceptionally ambitious for a Quaker building and clearly influenced by Wesley's New Rooms (qv).

(Gomme A, Jenner M and Little B: Bristol, An Architectural History: Bristol: 1979: 129; Ison W: The Georgian Buildings of Bristol: Bath: 1952: 62; An Inventory of Nonconformist Chapels...in Central England: Stell C: Gloucestershire: London: 1986: 65).

Listing NGR: ST5927773319

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
380238
Legacy System:
LBS

Sources

Books and journals
An Inventory of Nonconformist Chapels and Meeting Houses in Central England, (1986), 65
Gomme, A H, Jenner, M, Little, B D G, Bristol, An Architectural History, (1979), 129
Ison, W, The Georgian Buildings of Bristol, (1952), 62

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

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