GINGE PETRE ALMSHOUSES GINGE PETRE CHAPEL

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II
List Entry Number:
1207767
Date first listed:
20-Feb-1976
Date of most recent amendment:
09-Dec-1994
Statutory Address:
GINGE PETRE ALMSHOUSES, 5-8, ROMAN ROAD
Statutory Address:
GINGE PETRE CHAPEL, ROMAN ROAD

Map

Ordnance survey map of GINGE PETRE ALMSHOUSES
GINGE PETRE CHAPEL
© Crown Copyright and database right 2019. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2019. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
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Location

Statutory Address:
GINGE PETRE ALMSHOUSES, 5-8, ROMAN ROAD
Statutory Address:
GINGE PETRE CHAPEL, ROMAN ROAD

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:
Essex
District:
Brentwood (District Authority)
Parish:
Ingatestone and Fryerning
National Grid Reference:
TQ 64758 99252

Details

INGATESTONE AND FRYERNING TQ 6499 723-1/14/411 20/02/76 ROMAN ROAD, Ingatestone (South East Side) Nos 5-8 (consec) Ginge Petre Almshouses and Chapel (Formerly Listed as: BRENTWOOD, ROMAN ROAD Ingatestone Ginge Petre Almshouses) GV II

Terrace of almshouses and Roman Catholic chapel. 1840. Renovated in 1978 by Trehearne and Norman Preston. Red birck with black headers in diaper patterns and, dressings of gault brick, roofed with fishscale slates. One terrace of 4 almshouses facing NW, with chapel in centre, forming the rear of a quadrangle enclosed in 2 sides by other terrances. Tudor Revival Style. Single storey. Nos 5 and 8 (at the ends) each have 2 original cast-iron latticed casement windows, with chamfered jambs and segmental arches, and a central boarded door with verical moulded fillets, and chamfered jambs and 4-centred arch of gault brick. Nos 6 & 7 are sunukarm but each have only one window. Dogtooth eaves course. The black headers are glazed. Diagonal chimney shafts of red and black bricks in 1-2-2-1 arrangements. Ridge tiles of red clay. The gables have copings and kneelers of gault brick. The left gable end has 3 buttresses of red brick, covering the diaper pattern. The right gable end is not buttressed with a diaper pattern all over, but a small area is repaired with Flettons. The diaper pattern continues on the original reat elevation. The rear windows are C20 casements. The chapel had a gable wall standing one brick forward of the remainder of the front elevation, with 2 smaller windows in similar style, a similar central door, and a corbelled bell-turret without a bell. INTERIOR: Retangular and plain, with a coved ceiling, a central panel outlined by plaster mouldings, and 2 plaster roses in the middle;the larger, upper rose is whitem the smaller lower rose is painted red. Rear extensions of red brick with slate roofs to Nos 6 and 7 meet beind the chapel.

Listing NGR: TQ6475899252

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
373696
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 03 Sep 1999
Reference: IOE01/00189/08
Rights: Copyright IoE Mrs Colleen Cole. Source Historic England Archive
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