Swainston Manor

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II*
List Entry Number:
1209329
Date first listed:
21-Jul-1951
Statutory Address:
Swainston Manor, Newport Road, Calbourne, PO30 4HX

Map

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Location

Statutory Address:
Swainston Manor, Newport Road, Calbourne, PO30 4HX

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
Isle of Wight (Unitary Authority)
Parish:
Calbourne, Newtown and Porchfield
National Grid Reference:
SZ 44108 87818

Details

This list entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 15/07/2020

SZ48NW 1354-0/6/120

CALBOURNE NEWPORT ROAD Swainston Manor

21/07/51

II*

Former manor house, now hotel. Three builds. South east wing north section dates from c.1177 with C13 hall and chapel to north. This part was originally a manor house belonging to the bishops of Winchester as Abbots of the Monastery of St Swithin at Winchester and the C13 part was probably built by Richard of Ely, Bishop of Winchester 1268-80. Attached is a large house of c1750 built by the Barrington family and altered c.1790. The building was gutted by an incendiary bomb which fell on it in the Second World War but has been rebuilt.

South front east side has Great Hall of c.1177, partly flint partly stone rubble with stone quoins. Tiled roof with tumbling in to gable. Left gable end has arched stone window and blocked arch below. Front has pointed arched doorcase to Great Hall approached by wooden steps, two C13 lancets and three pointed arched windows with C18 leaded lights. To basement level are a four-centred arched stone doorway and three brick window surrounds with C20 casements.

East elevation has arched window with three lancets below with three circular lights above. Cross-shaped saddlestone to gable. Two lancets in south wall, arched doorcase at first floor level and similar arched doorcase below. Attached C12 three storey stone rubble wing to north with C12 double lancet window to east. Interior of Great Hall and chapel has C20 roof of arch braced type with curved queen posts and windbraces which probably copied the late mediaeval roof destroyed by the bomb.

Western part of the building is c.1750 refronted c.1790 but built on the foundations of an earlier C16 house. Built of ashlar with cemented chimneystacks. Two storeys. North front has centre of three bays and two projecting wings of three bays each all with 12-pane sashes. Centre ground floor has Tuscan columns with fluted capitals, frieze with paterae and pediment above with balustrading. Behind the pediment are two round-headed windows and double doors. Projecting wings have pediments with three 12-pane sashes below and two three-light curved bays with 12 pane sashes.

West front has five sash windows of mid C18 house with projecting early C19 ground floor with five tall windows to ballroom. To right is one bay extension of c.1790 with first floor 12-pane sash and round-headed windows to ground floor.

North front has parapet with stone coping, moulding cornice and stringcourse. Eight 12-pane sashes to first floor and French windows to ground floor with cast iron balustrade with diamond and circle patterns. Porch with columns, round-headed arches and balustrading.

East front is of three storeys, the upper floor of white brick, the lower floors of stone rubble. Attached is C18 stable range. Two storeys stone rubble with brick stringcourse. Tiled roof, hipped at one end. Three 12-pane sashes.

Ground floor has four cambered casements and round-headed doorcases. Entrance hall has two pairs of Ionic columns, doorcases with reeded architraves and paterae. Lounge has late C18 marble fireplace with engaged Tuscan columns and central panel with urns, swags and paterae. Cellar has the remains of a stone late C16 or early C17 door frame. The earliest reference to Swainston is in a charter of King Egbert of 827. This is the oldest standing domestic building in the Isle of Wight. Alfred Lord Tennyson is supposed to have composed Maud here while visiting his friend Sir John Simeon.

Listing NGR: SZ4410887818

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
393008
Legacy System:
LBS

Sources

Books and journals
Pevsner, N, The Buildings of England: Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, (1967), 736
Winter, CWR, The Manor Houses of the Isle of Wight, (1985), 147-151
Other
Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England, Part 23 Isle of Wight,

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 15 Aug 1999
Reference: IOE01/00327/01
Rights: Copyright IoE Rev Robert Rudd. Source Historic England Archive
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