14, COLLEGE GREEN

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II*
List Entry Number:
1245896
Date first listed:
23-Jan-1952
Statutory Address:
14, COLLEGE GREEN

Map

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Location

Statutory Address:
14, COLLEGE GREEN

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:
Gloucestershire
District:
Gloucester (District Authority)
National Grid Reference:
SO 83003 18854

Details

GLOUCESTER

SO8318NW COLLEGE GREEN 844-1/8/79 (West side) 23/01/52 No.14

GV II*

House assigned to the Prebendary of the Sixth Stall of Gloucester Cathedral, now house and part of office. Incorporates substantial remains of a monastic building, possibly the Almonery of the Benedictine Abbey of St Peter. Early C15, substantially remodelled in mid C16, C17 and C18 alterations; heavily restored and altered in late C19. Lower storey of stone rubble with ashlar dressings, some brick, upper storey timber-framed, the facade close-studded with mid rail; slate roof with dormers, brick stacks. PLAN: a long range, the upper storey probably of three bays, originally with an open timber roof over first-floor hall; at the northern end a cross-gabled wing projecting to front, perhaps the oriel to former hall or a solar chamber, the wing also projecting by one-bay at rear; the wing at first-floor level now sealed off and part of the office in the upper floor of St Mary's Gate (qv) adjoining to north. EXTERIOR: two storeys and attic. On the front the ground floor of squared stone rubble in courses except for brick panel at the southern end; doorway to left with C19 panelled door, a two-light stone-mullioned window on each side of doorway; to right a similar window close to the projecting bay, between the two windows to right a small window for the distribution of alms; in the projecting bay to right on the ground floor a stone-mullioned window of three-lights with an upper transom and casements with lead light glazing; the first floor of the range of C15 timber-framing, restored in C19, has close studding and intermediate rail, and three restored, perhaps late C16 or early C17, timber-framed mullioned windows with upper transoms: one of three-lights at the south end, the others of two lights and all with patterned leadlight glazing; the first floor of the projecting cross-gabled bay to right is timber-framed with jetty to front supported on a timber-framed cove rising from a moulded timber plate; in the front of the bay is timber-framed oriel window with an intermediate transom (5x2-lights) and casements with diamond pattern leadlight glazing, above the window a timber-framed gable with richly carved barge boards. On the roof of the main range to left a C18 gabled dormer with three casements with glazing bars and to left at higher level two smaller C18 gabled dormers, each with late C19 bargeboards and two casements.



At rear of the range and cross wing to left the ground floor is of squared rubble, and first floor of timber-framing similar to the front with the cross-wing jettied to front and on south side; the range on the first floor has a central three-light casement, a two-light casement to each side, all with leadlight glazing, and a small plain sash at left; in the gable-end wall of the cross-wing on the ground floor is a C20 three-light casement, on the first floor a C17 two-light casement, both with leadlight glazing; on the right hand side of the wing a C19 gabled dormer. INTERIOR: at rear of entrance hall is a mid C18 stair, probably moved, with closed string, column-on vase balusters, and toad-back hand rail; on first floor landing a balustrade with barleysugar balusters; otherwise mostly C19 fittings; on first floor a room with C18 cornice. In the attic one-bay of medieval former open timber roof ceiled at collar tie level; otherwise exposed framing with double purlins, both with stopped chamfers; between wall plates and lower purlins, and lower and upper purlins, are pairs of chamfered, cusped wind braces in form of cinqefoiled arches; separating the adjoining roof bay to south an inserted C16 timber-framed partition with close studding and intermediate rail. (Eward S: No Fine but a Glass of Wine, Cathedral Life at Gloucester: Salisbury: 1985-: 319; BOE: Verey D: Gloucestershire: The Vale and the Forest of Dean: London: 1976-: 243).







Listing NGR: SO8300318854

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
472170
Legacy System:
LBS

Sources

Books and journals
Eward, S , No Fine but a Glass of Wine Cathedral Life at Gloucester, (1985), 319
Verey, D , The Buildings of England: Gloucestershire 2 The Vale and The Forest of Dean, (1970), 243

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 24 Jan 2001
Reference: IOE01/02969/29
Rights: Copyright IoE Mr Jack Farley. Source Historic England Archive
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