CHURCH OF ST ANN

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
I
List Entry Number:
1247612
Date first listed:
25-Feb-1952
Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST ANN, ST ANN STREET

Map

Ordnance survey map of CHURCH OF ST ANN
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Location

Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST ANN, ST ANN STREET

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
Manchester (Metropolitan Authority)
National Grid Reference:
SJ 83784 98354

Details

SJ 8398 SE, 698-1/27/384

MANCHESTER, ST ANN STREET (South side), Church of St Ann

25/02/52

GV

I

Church. 1709-12 (traditionally said to have been designed by Sir Christopher Wren or one of his pupils); restored 1886-91 by Alfred Waterhouse. Sandstone ashlar, hipped slate roof. Classical style. Nave with east apse and west tower. The 2-storey 6-bay nave has coupled pilasters to both levels, the lower being fluted Corinthian and the upper plain, both with cornices, each bay containing large round-headed windows with keystones, and the westernmost a square headed doorway in a large pedimented tetrastyle Corinthian doorcase with fluted columns; and a pilastered parapet (formerly with urns). The semi-circular full-height apse has tall fluted Corinthian pilasters, a full entablature with carved emblems on the frieze, a very prominent cornice, and large round-headed windows with panelled aprons, moulded imposts and enriched keystones. The square west tower has four stages divided by string courses and a mid-height cornice, rusticated clasping corner pilasters to the lower half, a Tuscan pilaster west doorway, coupled round-headed lancets to the second stage, an oculus in a blank arch to the third stage (and clock-faces under segmental pediments in the north and south sides), a belfry stage with coupled fluted Corinthian pilasters framing round-headed 3-light louvred belfry windows with keystones, and a moulded cornice and balustraded parapet (originally surrounding a 3-stage cupola).

INTERIOR: galleries on three sides, supported by stout Tuscan columns (replacing square pillars), and with upper arcades on original slender Tuscan columns; most furnishings dating from C19 restoration, including choir in nave, but fragments of original pulpit and communion rail survive. Stained glass by Frederick Shields.

HISTORY: second oldest church in Manchester, built as part of early C18 development of St Ann's Square; formerly had strong Whig and Anti-Jacobite connections; John Wesley preached here 1733 and 1738, Thomas De Quincey was baptized here 1785.

Listing NGR: SJ8378898353

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
457202
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 25 Sep 2002
Reference: IOE01/09315/03
Rights: Copyright IoE Mr Peter Hyde. Source Historic England Archive
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