1, KING WILLIAM STREET

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II
List Entry Number:
1252015
Date first listed:
15-May-1990
Statutory Address:
1, KING WILLIAM STREET

Map

Ordnance survey map of 1, KING WILLIAM STREET
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Location

Statutory Address:
1, KING WILLIAM STREET

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:
Greater London Authority
District:
City and County of the City of London (London Borough)
National Grid Reference:
TQ 32745 81014

Details

KING WILLIAM STREET TQ 3281 SE 10/331 No 1

II GV

Bank with offices over. 1921-2 by William Campbell-Jones and Alex Smithers for the London Assurance Co. Portland stone, chanelled at ground floor, ashlar to upper, facing a steel frame with staircases and vaults in reinforced concrete. Slated mansard roof with stepped dormers. 5 storeys, attics and semi-basement. Main facade 5 windows. Classical style on a triangular site. Semi-basement with large metal framed windows of frosted square panes with margins at edges and centre a top frieze of small rectangular panes; fronted by cast iron rail- ings having simplified urn finials. Ground floor openings architraved with festooned console keystones; recessed metal framed windows with margin glazing. Plain band at first floor level supporting giant pilasters, with cartouche capitals, at angles which carry the main entablature with projecting bracketed cornice at 4th floor level and continued around the building. Smaller first floor windows giving mezzanine effect, each with balustraded balcony and separated by pilasters with wreaths terminating with entablature above 2nd floor windows, each with alternating cornice or pediment on console brackets. 3rd floor windows architraved, 4th floor attic storey plain; moulded eaves cornice. Main entrance at right hand angle being 4 storeys running into the building on an axis canted at an angle to the St Swithins have elevation. Hexagonal ante- porch with openings on 3 sides having plain surrounds with console brackets supporting aedicules over; steps within, ceiling with sunken dome; doorway altered. Left hand angle curved with 3 windows; 2nd floor centre opening, a round-arched niche enriched with a festoon. At roof level, a pilastered 2-storey rotunda with copper dome resting on enriched copper brackets. The shape of the site was exploited to create interestingly shaped rooms, in particular on the 1st and 2nd floor. Planning on an axial line took full advantage of the pen area on the south. The battered ground floor allowed more light into the building. No 1 forms a group with Nos 3-7 King William Street and Nos 1-6 Lombard Street.

Listing NGR: TQ3273480979

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
434936
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 01 Oct 2000
Reference: IOE01/01995/20
Rights: Copyright IoE Mr Bob Manekshaw. Source Historic England Archive
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