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CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS WITH ANCHORAGE ATTACHED

List Entry Summary

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

Name: CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS WITH ANCHORAGE ATTACHED

List entry Number: 1257067

Location

CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS WITH ANCHORAGE ATTACHED, NORTH STREET

The building may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:

District: York

District Type: Unitary Authority

Parish:

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: I

Date first listed: 14-Jun-1954

Date of most recent amendment: Not applicable to this List entry.

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: LBS

UID: 464276

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Building

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

YORK

SE6051NW NORTH STREET 1112-1/28/812 (West side) 14/06/54 Church of All Saints with Anchorage attached

GV I

Church and Anchorage attached. C12 nave; part of north and south arcades early C13; east end rebuilt and chancel chapels added in early C14; aisles widened incorporating chancel chapels in early C15; nave and aisles extended westwards and tower with spire added in later C15; chancel and chancel aisles reroofed in late C15; C18 weathervane added to spire. Restorations by JB and W Atkinson 1866-67, during which south aisle was rebuilt and porch and vestry added; 1908, during which the Anchorage was reconstructed by E Ridsdale Tate; further restoration in 1991 by Peter Marshall, Architects. MATERIALS: magnesian limestone ashlar and squared rubble stone incorporating a number of incised coffin lids; small area of red brick in random bond at west end of north side; parallel roofs tiled, with stone coped gables. Anchorage of shuttered concrete, with planted timber-framing and concrete infilling; roof part tile, part concrete, part asphalt. PLAN: 7-bay aisled nave and continuous chancel, with embraced tower to west; south porch and vestry. Anchorage attached to south-west corner. EXTERIOR: triple-gabled east end, centre part flanked by dwarf buttresses, south gable on chamfered plinth; each has pointed window of three foiled lights, the centre one with Decorated tracery, the outer ones with reticulated tracery. To north of the north window is a small niche with a 4-centred head. North side partly on chamfered plinth, with three weathered buttresses, largely restored; entrance in 6th bay from east, in chamfered 2-centred doorway with plain hoodmould. Easternmost window pointed with reticulated tracery reset from east end window, the head cut back by later re-roofing. Remaining windows are square-headed, of 2 or 3 cinquefoiled lights, in renewed hollow-chamfered surrounds. Rebuilt south side incorporates several large fragments on incised coffin lids. Windows are of 3 cinquefoiled lights with chamfered surrounds and mullions, beneath square heads and hoodmoulds. Porch entered from east side through 2-centred chamfered doorway beneath coved hoodmould. At west end, 3-stage tower and spire, flanked by gabled ends of north and south aisles. Tower ground stage square on plan; upper stages octagonal, weathering at base of alternate faces forming bases of slim buttresses. Openwork parapet at base of octagonal spire surmounted by C18 brass weathercock. On tower ground stage, west window is of three cinquefoiled lights in 2-centred head, with, above, an ogee-arched trefoil-headed niche. Second and third stages have windows to each cardinal face: on second

stage, windows are of 2 lights in flattened 2-centred head; those on third stage, transomed, of 2 lights. West windows to north and south aisles are 2-centred, of 3 cinque-foiled lights with one tier of panel tracery. In all parts of the church, much window tracery has been renewed. Anchorage: one-and-a-half storeys; 1 bay north front with pent half bay to west. Entrance is C20 board door to south of pent bay. Full bay raised on arch-braced concrete deck, jettied on north side with 4-light oriel window and coved eaves surmounted by embattled cresting. Half bay has single light windows to north and west, and bargeboarded eaves. All windows are trefoil-headed square lattice casements, those in oriel with carved panel tracery and risers carved with roses and foliage. INTERIOR: chancel: double-chamfered jambs of east window original, incorporating carved demifigure at each side, at springing point of inner chamfer. In chancel north wall, square-headed aumbry of paired trefoil-headed niches. In south-east corner 2 bays of C12 wall arcade survive, of trefoil-headed niches on attached shafts with bell capitals, in 2-centred arches separated by continuous band of dogtooth moulding. North and south arcades of 2-centred arches, either single or double chamfered, some chamfers slight, some broad. Piers and responds mainly octagonal, the easterly with square abaci, hollow-chamfered underneath, the westerly with octagonal capitals and square abaci with crudely broached angle stops. Three piers earlier. One in north arcade is monolithic Roman column shaft re-used with roll-moulded base and square abacus, hollow-chamfered on under side; second one in north arcade is cylindrical with necking, bell capital carved with nailhead moulding and chamfered round abacus, on double roll-moulded base. In south arcade, one pier is cylindrical with necking, hollow-chamfered capital and square abacus, on water-holding, double roll-moulded base. Third pier from east in north arcade has tonsured demifigure corbel supporting a polygonal shelf on west face. Tower arches are hollow-chamfered and die into octagonal and half-octagonal piers and responds on square bases with crude broach stops. In north wall beneath tower is small pointed chamfered doorway leading to newel stair, corbelled out over north-west corner. South doorway within porch is pointed arch of one continuous order, roll-moulded on each side of band of nailhead moulding. In west wall of south aisle are two square chamfered openings, one blocked, connecting with former anchorage. Roofs. Chancel and three eastern bays of north and south aisles have 6 trusses of arch-braced moulded principals on angel-corbelled hammerbeams, with moulded collars and purlins, and carved bosses. Wall plates finished with embattled cresting. In north aisle, three corbels, wall posts and chamfered wall plate survive from earlier roof. STAINED GLASS: the Church is notable for containing the finest

collection of medieval glass in York, mostly C15, outside York Minster (qv). FITTINGS: include: chancel screens by E Ridsdale Tate, of 1906. Hexagonal pulpit with painted decoration, dated Anno Dom. 1675. Medieval octagonal bowl font on octagonal stem with moulded foot. C18 Benefaction, Commandment, Credence and Mayoral Boards. Sculpture: by tower south pier, carved female head with traces of paint; round stoup on square block. Carvings: misericorde in Chancel, carved with pelican in piety, and the monogram and arms of John Gilyot, Rector 1467-72/3; image of King David playing the harp, possibly from C18 reredos. MONUMENTS: include a cartouche to John Etty, d.1709, on south aisle wall. Floor slab variously to John Stoddart, Rector, inducted March 1593, to Joan Stoddart, d.1599; to James, son of Thomas Pennyman, d.1699, and Esther, wife, 1745. Black marble floor slab to Joshua Witton, d.1674. Brasses include: black lettered plate to William Stockton, d.1471, and Robert Colynson, d.1458, both Lord Mayors of York, and to Isabella, widow of Robert Colynson, second wife of William Stockton, set in floor slab to John Wardall; plate inscribed to Thomas Clerk, d.1482, and wife Margaret, set in marble floor slab with Evangelists' symbols (one missing). Wall plates to Thomas Askwith, d.1609, and wife Anne; and to Charles Townley, d.1712. (Bartholomew City Guides: Hutchinson J and Palliser DM: York: Edinburgh: 1980-: 228-230; City of York: RCHME: South-west of the Ouse: HMSO: 1972-: 3-10).



Listing NGR: SE6005251758

Selected Sources

Books and journals
An Inventory of the City of York III South West, (1972), 3-10
Hutchinson, J, Palliser, D M, 'Bartholomew City Guides' in York, (1980), 228-230

National Grid Reference: SE 60053 51758

Map

Map
© Crown Copyright and database right 2018. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2018. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
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End of official listing