THE LAWN ATTACHED WALLS AND TERRACE

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II
List Entry Number:
1271496
Date first listed:
22-Dec-1998
Statutory Address:
THE LAWN ATTACHED WALLS AND TERRACE, 1-36, MARK HALL NORTH

Map

Ordnance survey map of THE LAWN ATTACHED WALLS AND TERRACE
© Crown Copyright and database right 2019. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
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Location

Statutory Address:
THE LAWN ATTACHED WALLS AND TERRACE, 1-36, MARK HALL NORTH

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:
Essex
District:
Harlow (District Authority)
National Grid Reference:
TL 46707 11230

Details

TL 41 SE HARLOW MARK HALL NORTH

973/2/10005 Nos. 1-36 The lawn, attached walls And terrace

GV II

Ten storey block of flats, attached walls and terrace. 1950-51, by Frederick Gibberd. Irregular trapezoid plan, with tapering circulation core, angled wings and gently convex south front. There are two one-bed flats and two bedsitters on each floor (four bedsits on the ground floor) with the projecting ends of each wing used to secure a south-facing balcony for each apartment, and the living rooms of the flats also have supplementary east or west facing windows. The grouped bathrooms and kitchens on the east and west flanks account for the regular pattern of four small square windows on each elevation, while the balconies and recesses are used to throw the centre panel of the curved south front, in light buff brick, into bold relief. A warm red brick was used as the main cladding material of the reinforced concrete structure, unusually laid as a solid 14" wall in double stretcher bond. This is indicative of the care and subtlety of the overall design, which represents the best of British housing design of the early 1950s. The block has retained its original character and although the original metal windows have been replaced in UPVC this has not harmed the integrity of the building. Attached terracing around the east side and attached wall to the north, providing transition to low block. Interiors not of special interest. The Lawn was the first residential tower block in Britain and received a Ministry of Health Housing medal in 1952.



Listing NGR: TL4670711230

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
472019
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

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