HOLY TRINITY CHURCH

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II*
List Entry Number:
1272059
Date first listed:
08-Jan-1999
Statutory Address:
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH, TRINITY ROAD

Map

Ordnance survey map of HOLY TRINITY CHURCH
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Location

Statutory Address:
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH, TRINITY ROAD

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
Birmingham (Metropolitan Authority)
National Grid Reference:
SP 06694 90103

Details





SP 09 SE BIRMINGHAM TRINITY ROAD

3/10211 Holy Trinity Church

II* Anglican church. 1864; by J.A. Chatwin. Rock-faced red sandstone with bands ofwhite limestone, and white limestone dressings. Steeply pitched slate roof with stone-coped gable ends and red clay ridge tiles. PLAN: Nave, chancel with polygonal apse, N and S aisles, short transepts and south porch with tower and spire over; later C19 vestry on south side of chancel. High Victorian Gothic style. EXTERIOR: Geometric tracery windows. Aisles have 2-light windows, gabled transepts with large stone rose windows with plate tracery , and on south side a porch through a large tower with angle buttresses, tall 2-light bell-openings and a stone broach spire with gargoyles, lucarnes and carved frieze bands. Small clerestory windows of three cusped lights. Large 4-light west window with Geometric tracery , moulded pointed arch doorway below and trefoil above. Buttresses with weathered set-offs. Polygonal apse with tall 2-light windows with Geometric tracery. INTERIOR: Ashlar walls with deep rear-arches. Lofty nave with 5-bay arcades with double-chamfered arches, and round piers with stiff -leaf capitals. Alternate principals of the scissor-braced nave roof spring from angel corbels low down on the clerestory walls, with ceiled ashlar- pieces above. Chancel and apse roof painted. Deeply moulded chancel arch, the inner order on corbel shafts. Apse has blind cusped arcading, canopied sedilea and reredos with canopy over carved relief of Crucifixion. Encaustic floor tiles. Furpishings intact, including Communion rail, choir stalls, lecterns and pews, organ cantilevered out on angel.brackets, elaborate stone pulpit and font. Stained glass by Clayton and Bell; Heaton Butler and Bayne; Hardman; and Alexander Gibbs of Bedford. SOURCE: Buildings of England, p.182.

Listing NGR: SP0669490103

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
472700
Legacy System:
LBS

Sources

Books and journals
Pevsner, N, Wedgwood, A, The Buildings of England: Warwickshire, (1966), 182

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Reference: IOE01/00017/37
Rights: Copyright IoE Mr Geoff Dowling. Source Historic England Archive
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