CHURCH OF ST LUKE

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II*
List Entry Number:
1280622
Date first listed:
28-Jun-1952
Date of most recent amendment:
19-Jun-1985
Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST LUKE, BERRY STREET

Map

Ordnance survey map of CHURCH OF ST LUKE
© Crown Copyright and database right 2019. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2019. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
Use of this data is subject to Terms and Conditions.

The above map is for quick reference purposes only and may not be to scale. For a copy of the full scale map, please see the attached PDF - 1280622.pdf

The PDF will be generated from our live systems and may take a few minutes to download depending on how busy our servers are. We apologise for this delay.

This copy shows the entry on 20-Nov-2019 at 14:35:20.

Location

Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST LUKE, BERRY STREET

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
Liverpool (Metropolitan Authority)
National Grid Reference:
SJ 35264 89871

Details



392/56/149 BERRY STREET 28-JUN-1952 CHURCH OF ST LUKE (Formerly listed as: BERRY STREET CHURCH OF ST LUKE WITH RAILINGS AND PIERS SURROUNDING CHURCH) GV II*

Former Anglican church, approach steps and raised flagged forecourt, now deconsecrated shell. 1811-32. By John Foster, architect of Liverpool, for the Corporation of Liverpool, the design amended and the work completed by John Foster junior. Minor amendments 1864-73 by William and John Audsley of Liverpool, damaged by bombing May 1941. Ashlar sandstone. Perpendicular Gothic style. PLAN: Nave, chancel, and west tower with 3-sided front approach to Berry Street, stepped on a sloping site and terminating at a spacious flagged forecourt. EXTERIOR: Tower has west entrance of 4 orders with ogival hood mould with poppyhead. Flanking porches with 2-light windows, and entrances to north and south. Polygonal buttresses at angles of tower which is of 3 storeys. 2nd stage has 3-light windows and traceried frieze above with clocks to all sides. 3rd stage has 4-light windows and ogival hood moulds; traceried panelling to spandrels and buttresses. Battlemented parapet and 4 flat- topped pinnacles. Nave of 5 bays with windows of 3 lights between panelled buttresses ending in crocketed pinnacles above the battlemented parapet. Chancel of 4 bays and apsidal end. Flanking porches at west end. Windows of 3- lights between panelled buttresses with crocketed pinnacles, panelling above windows. East window of 5 lights. Panelled octagonal finials with flat tops. INTERIOR: The church was severely damaged and its interior destroyed during an air raid in 1941. Internal finishes remain as exposed brick and stone. Brick 4-centred chancel arch. The church retains its bell frame in the tower. Thought to be the first cast-iron bell frame to be made, it is inscribed ' GEORGE GILLEBRAND BELL HANGER 1828'

HISTORY: St Luke's Church was built on a site purchased by the Corporation of Liverpool in 1791, and was planned to serve the new suburbs being developed for the prosperous on the Corporation' Estate. After the commencement of works in 1805, the brief was changed to allow the new building to provide the functions of ceremonial place of worship for the Corporation and fee paying concert hall. The provision of an unusually spacious chancel is thought to have been based on the need the to provide a segregated area of worship for Members of the Corporation. The concert hall function was maintained until the erection of the Philharmonic Hall in Hope Street in the mid-C19. Forms a group with railings, plinth walls, gates, piers and steps surrounding the Church of St. Luke (q.v.)

St. Luke's Church together with the surrounding enclosure walling, railings, steps, piers and gates (q.v.) which define its setting were designed to serve as the church of the Corporation of Liverpool by John Foster of Liverpool and later by his son John Foster junior. Despite severe damage during World War II, the church and its railed enclosure remain an outstandingly rich example of early C19 ecclesiastical Perpendicular Gothic architecture, and an architectural, historical and historic townscape ensemble of monumental significance at the heart of the city of Liverpool.

Listing NGR: SJ3526889870

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
213761
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 23 Feb 2003
Reference: IOE01/06439/22
Rights: Copyright IoE Mr David Cross. Source Historic England Archive
Archive image, may not represent current condition of site.
To view this image please use Firefox, Chrome, Safari, or Edge.

Your Contributions

Do you know more about this entry?

The following information has been contributed by users volunteering for our Enriching The List project. For small corrections to the List Entry please see our Minor Amendments procedure.

The information and images below are the opinion of the contributor, are not part of the official entry and do not represent the official position of Historic England. We have not checked that the contributions below are factually accurate. Please see our terms and conditions. If you wish to report an issue with a contribution or have a question please email [email protected].