FEERINGBURY MANOR

Overview

Heritage Category: Listed Building

Grade: II*

List Entry Number: 1306710

Date first listed: 02-May-1953

Statutory Address: FEERINGBURY MANOR, COGGESHALL ROAD

Map

Ordnance survey map of FEERINGBURY MANOR
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Location

Statutory Address: FEERINGBURY MANOR, COGGESHALL ROAD

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County: Essex

District: Braintree (District Authority)

Parish: Feering

National Grid Reference: TL 86331 21558

Summary

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

FEERING COGGESHALL ROAD TL 82 SE (west side)

3/83 Feeringbury Manor 2.5.53

GV II*

House. Circa 1300, altered in C15, C16, C18, C19 and C20. Timber framed, plastered, roofed with handmade red plain tiles. 3-bay hall facing NE, formerly aisled, with C16 stack to rear of middle bay. C15 3-bay crosswing to right, extending forwards; with C16 and C18 external stacks to right, and C19 external stack to rear. Late C16 3-bay crosswing to left, extending further forwards, with C16 and C19 external stacks to left. C18/early C19 extension to left of front bay. C18 and C19 extensions to rear of hall range. Other C19 extensions were demolished c.1960. 2 storeys. Ground floor, 4 C19/20 casements, one Gothic Revival casement with 2-centred head and Y-tracery, and early C19 splayed bay of sashes below jetty of right crosswing, extending forwards. First floor, 2 C19/20 casements, 3 early C19 tripartite sashes, and one small fixed light with glazed margins. C19 Gothic Revival door with 2-centred head, in gabled porch with bargeboards. 2 plain brackets below jetty of right crosswing. Late C19 scrolled brackets below eaves of left crosswing. In the right return a French window is cut through the C16 stack; on the first floor is one early C19 sash of 12 lights. In the left return a French window is cut through the C16 stack, which has an ovolo-moulded cornice and 3 octagonal shafts. The rear stack has 3 octagonal shafts, truncated. The roof of the right crosswing has a gablet hip to the rear. The hall has a late C16 inserted floor, with chamfered beams and lamb's tongue stops. The aisles have been removed in the C16, and studding has been inserted below the arcade plates. The roof retains some heavily smoke-blackened original rafters, mostly re-set in the C16 with unsooted pegs; one rafter has an oblique trench for a passing-brace near the apex; the tiebeams are not morticed for crownposts. The right crosswing has a studded partition at both storeys between the middle and rear bays, an edge-halved and bridled scarf in the right wallplate, jowled posts, a cambered tiebeam, and crownpost roof with gauging holes and axial braces. The front ground floor room of it has been extensively altered in Gothic Revival style, with a carved monogram E.R.C. (for E.R. Corder) and date 1878 on a post to the left. Re-set in the front windows are 2 roundels of C16 glass, E.R. with a crowned rose, and R.H. with the arms of Heygate (for Sir Richard Heygate). The left crosswing has on the upper storey a studded partition between the middle and rear bays, jowled posts, a cambered tiebeam, and a clasped purlin roof with arched wind-bracing. The absence of gauging holes in the rafters, and the ovolo moulding of the stack, indicates a date of construction after 1575, but probably not later than 1600. The manor was held by the Abbot of Westminster from an unknown date, but certainly by 1343, until the Dissolution. Henry VII granted it to his newly created Bishopric of Westminster in 1540; under Edward VI the Bishopric was suppressed, and Feeringbury passed to the Bishop of London in 1550. (P. Morant, The History and Antiquities of the County of Essex, 1768, II, 171. Feeringbury was held by the Quaker families of Corder and Catchpole from c.1717 (B.L. Kentish, Kelvedon and its Antiquities, 1974, 63-4. RCHM 4.

Listing NGR: TL8633121558

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number: 116404

Legacy System: LBS

Sources

Books and journals
Kentish, BL , Kelvedon and its Antiquities, (1974), 63-4
Morant, P, The History and Antiquities of the County of Essex, (1768), 171

End of official listing