CHURCH OF ST STEPHEN

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
I
List Entry Number:
1336844
Date first listed:
03-Dec-1949
Date of most recent amendment:
13-Oct-1999
Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST STEPHEN, HALES DRIVE

Map

Ordnance survey map of CHURCH OF ST STEPHEN
© Crown Copyright and database right 2019. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
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Location

Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST STEPHEN, HALES DRIVE

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:
Kent
District:
Canterbury (District Authority)
National Grid Reference:
TR 14832 59158

Details

TR 15 NW HACKINGTON HALES DRIVE

956/11/248 Church of St Stephen

03.12.49 I

Parish church. Nave of c1100, tower C12, chancel C14 and south transept rebuilt in late C16. Cruciform shape. Flint and stone rubble with tiled roof but south chapel mainly brick. Four bay nave with lower three bay chancel, west tower, south porch and north and south transepts. Three stage west tower is Norman but with cinquefoil bell stage with wooden louvres and has hexagonal weatherboarded base to shingled spire with metal finial. Wide buttresses. First floor has round-headed windows, second floor has lancets. Arched doorcase to west with zigzag moulding and rows of colonnettes. Nave has one round-headed window and two pointed lancets to south and three pointed lancets to north. South porch of flint and ironstone with some reused stone fragments including zigzag. C13 arched doorcase but double perpendicular windows. South transept has flint base and brick above, mainly covered in render with four round-headed brick mullioned windows. East side has double trefoiled windows. North transept has C14 north window with three trefoils and three trefoils within circles above. Triple round-headed window to east and double pointed-headed windows to west. Chancel is of flint, brick and stone rubble with restored double cinquefoil lights and buttresses and large 5-light traceried cinquefoil headed east window flanked by trefoil windows. INTERIOR: Fine west door dated 1630 with motto "let all things be done decently and in order". Stone font dated 1591 with buttressed stem and panelled octagonal bowl Jacobean pulpit. Coat of arms of William III. Part of 1519 rood screen by Michael Bonversall, a copy of the one at Holy Cross Westgate, is resited in the south transept. Tower screen dated 1630. North transept window by Kempe 1889. Armorial fragments to windows of porch and south transept. Monument to Sir Roger Manwood d. 1592 with waist length portrait in robes of Chief Baron of the Exchequer, his two wives and issue framed by columns and entablature with skeleton on half-rolled up pallet below. Richard Ibbotson (d1731) wall tablet with scrolled open pediment. Source: Pevsner BOE North East and East Kent pp 244 and 245.

Listing NGR: TR1402860922

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
170627
Legacy System:
LBS

Sources

Books and journals
Newman, J, The Buildings of England: North East and East Kent, (1969), 244, 245

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

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