CHURCH OF ST MICHAEL

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
I
List Entry Number:
1343558
Date first listed:
18-Jan-1968
Date of most recent amendment:
24-Feb-1987
Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST MICHAEL

Map

Ordnance survey map of CHURCH OF ST MICHAEL
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Location

Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST MICHAEL

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:
Northamptonshire
District:
Daventry (District Authority)
Parish:
Stowe IX Churches
National Grid Reference:
SP 63890 57684

Details

STOWE NINE CHURCHES CHURCH STOWE SP65NW 6/119 Church of St. Michael 18/01/68 GV I Church. Saxon west tower, body of the church rebuilt c.1639, and again in 1859, by Philip Hardwick. Coursed squared limestone with ironstone dressings, some brick. Roofs mainly tiled, rest of lead. Chancel, nave, north and south nave and chancel aisles, north chancel vestry, south porch, west tower. East windows to vestry and chancel have 3 lights and Decorated style tracery, rest 2 and 3-light mullion windows with hood moulds. Crenellated parapets to nave and chancel, plain to aisles. North door has round arch and imposts. Early English south door with nailhead hood mould in gabled porch; south aisle extends across south side of west tower. Saxon west tower of 3 stages, plastered rubble, with medieval battlements. Ground floor has blocked square-headed door with jambs laid alternately upright and flat, partially blocked square-headed window with hood mould above; carved stone, probably part of a cross-shaft incorporated in north-west angle. First floor has original double-splayed round-headed west window; datestone inscribed 1776 below, possibly recording date of strengthening of tower with 2 iron bands. String course to belfry stage cut by 2-light medieval windows; pilaster strips to west and east side of latter windows. Interior: chancel with Jacobean reredos. 2 bay arcades to north and south aisles, nave arcades of 3 bays. Scissor-braced roofs to nave and chancel. Lady chapel in south chancel aisle has Jacobean screenwork with small niches on balusters, formerly part of screen between nave and chancel. Fine C13 and early C17 chest tombs with effigies, the latter by Nicholas Stone, C17, C18 and C19 wall monuments and ambitious wall monument to Thomas Turner who died 1714, with life-sized figures of deceased and "Christian Faith'. (Buildings of England, Northants, 1973. H.M. Taylor, Anglo-Saxon Architecture, Vol. II, p.594, 1965).

Listing NGR: SP6389057684

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
360609
Legacy System:
LBS

Sources

Books and journals
Pevsner, N, The Buildings of England: Northamptonshire, (1961)
Taylor, H M, J , , Anglo Saxon Architecture, (1965), 594

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 01 May 2002
Reference: IOE01/07192/05
Rights: Copyright IoE Mr Michael E. Megeary. Source Historic England Archive
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