NUMBER 23 STREET NUMBER 27 ROW

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II*
List Entry Number:
1376072
Date first listed:
10-Jan-1972
Date of most recent amendment:
06-Aug-1998
Statutory Address:
NUMBER 23 STREET, 23, BRIDGE STREET AND ROW
Statutory Address:
NUMBER 27 ROW, 27, BRIDGE STREET AND ROW

Map

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Location

Statutory Address:
NUMBER 23 STREET, 23, BRIDGE STREET AND ROW
Statutory Address:
NUMBER 27 ROW, 27, BRIDGE STREET AND ROW

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
Cheshire West and Chester (Unitary Authority)
National Grid Reference:
SJ 40558 66227

Details

CHESTER CITY (IM)

SJ4066SE BRIDGE STREET AND ROW 595-1/4/63 (East side) 10/01/72 No.23 Street and No.27 Row (Formerly Listed as: BRIDGE STREET No.23 Street & No.27 Row)

GV II*

Undercroft and town house, now undercroft office, Row shop and upper storeys partly in office use. Probably early-mid C14; 1804; altered C20. Flemish bond brown brick, grey slate roof with ridge at right-angle to street, hipped to front. EXTERIOR: 4 storeys, one bay. Modern office front to street; brick north pier; brick pier probably of sandstone, rendered; a fascia covers the bressumer. The cast-iron Row-front rail has bottom rail, stick balusters and plain top-rail; brick north pier, rendered south pier; 2 cast-iron Roman Doric intermediate columns; slightly sloped boarded stallboard 1.68m from front to back; modern tiled surface to Row walk; modern shopfront; covered door to rear passage, south; plaster ceiling; wood fascia hides Row-top bressumer. The brick upper storeys have painted stone sills and wedge lintels; 2 cross casements to the third storey have a large pane to each lower light and 6 panes to each upper light; 2 similar but shorter fourth storey cross-casements have 4 panes in each upper light; painted cornice and low stone parapet. INTERIOR: the undercroft 3 steps down from the street has a cased beam under back of stallboard, then 4 cross-beams each on end-posts and 2 inserted intermediate posts cased in wood. Flat oak joists have chamfers with stops visible at rear ends; one joist in the second bay has both ends stopped; 2 in the third bay have both ends of chamfers more simply stopped; a suspended ceiling covers the joists in the fourth bay. The sidewalls now covered, are stated to be sandstone, probably medieval. The Row shop has all surfaces covered. A Row door, now covered, with substantial architrave in the rear passage leads to the third and fourth storeys; as is common east of Bridge Street; the upper storeys suggest either a former courtyard house or a formerly separate rear dwelling. A late C19 stair leads to the third storey, with a partly covered sash with radial bars in the round arch at its head. A 6-panel door leads to the front room, now partitioned, which has a substantial skirting, a sub-panel to each window, a painted C19 fireplace, north, and a plaster cornice; a lateral stair behind the front room leading to the fourth storey has an open



string, simple shaped brackets, a slender turned newel, covered treads, 2 stick balusters per step and a swept rail; the next third storey room from the landing, through a basket archway with pilasters, has a light-well above, and may have been inserted; the third room has a concave corner chimney breast, a cornice north and east and a ceiling rose; the mildly Gothick fourth room has 2 sharply arched niches, a broader 4-centred arched recess, a patterned cornice and a recessed 12-pane sash. The fourth storey front room has a blocked fireplace, north, and a sub-panel to each window; the passage has a basket archway with roll-moulded arrises to pilasters; the middle room has a 6-panel door; the north back room has a blocked corner fireplace and a sub-panel to the recessed 12-pane sash; a 6-panel door to the south back room which has a simple corner fireplace and a sub-panel to the recessed 12-pane sash. The back passage and the rear, externally, have no visible features of special interest. The principle area of interest is the undercroft; it is probable that there is more medieval structure than is now visible. (Chester Rows Research Project: Harris R: Archive, Bridge Street East: 1989-).





Listing NGR: SJ4055866227

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
470058
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 30 Jun 2001
Reference: IOE01/06877/06
Rights: Copyright IoE Dr John L. Wishlade. Source Historic England Archive
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