Prayer hall and section of attached cemetery wall to Ramsgate Jewish Cemetery

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II
List Entry Number:
1392476
Date first listed:
17-Mar-2008
Statutory Address:
Prayer hall and section of attached cemetery wall to Ramsgate Jewish Cemetery, Dumpton Park Road

Map

Ordnance survey map of Prayer hall and section of attached cemetery wall to Ramsgate Jewish Cemetery
© Crown Copyright and database right 2020. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2020. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
Use of this data is subject to Terms and Conditions.

The above map is for quick reference purposes only and may not be to scale. For a copy of the full scale map, please see the attached PDF - 1392476.pdf

The PDF will be generated from our live systems and may take a few minutes to download depending on how busy our servers are. We apologise for this delay.

This copy shows the entry on 20-Jan-2020 at 19:07:43.

Location

Statutory Address:
Prayer hall and section of attached cemetery wall to Ramsgate Jewish Cemetery, Dumpton Park Road

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:
Kent
District:
Thanet (District Authority)
Parish:
Ramsgate
National Grid Reference:
TR3822665910

Reasons for Designation

The prayer hall or ohel to Ramsgate Jewish Cemetery and the contemporary section of attached cemetery wall is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons:

* It is an intact example of an ohel of which only about 55 examples are known to exist in England and of these only four are currently listed; * The ohel was built circa 1872 and only one listed and two unlisted examples are earlier in date; * It is a rare example of an ohel to a private cemetery, donated to the local Jewish community; * The attached contemporary part of the cemetery wall is part of the original design.



Details

1413/0/10041

DUMPTON PARK ROAD RAMSGATE Prayer hall and section of attached cemetery wall to Ramsgate Jewish Cemetery 17-MAR-08 II Prayer hall and attached cemetery boundary wall. Circa 1872 prayer hall or 'ohel' built of brick, rendered, with gabled slate roof and attached wall of flint and stock brick.

PLAN: Single-storey rectangular structure with elaborate entrance to the west and attached section of wall to north and south.

EXTERIOR: The west or entrance front has a gable with brick dogtooth cornice flanked by tall square stock brick piers. These have pyramidal cemented caps with red brick dogtooth moulding. Beneath the gable is a round-headed entrance arch with keystone bearing the incised Hebrew date of construction. There is a semi-circular fanlight and plank double door. Attached to the north and south are sections of cemetery boundary walls about 2m high, constructed of flint with stock brick lacing courses, brick piers and plain copings which are ramped up by the side of the ohel. The 1931 extension of the boundary wall is not included in the listing.

INTERIOR: A Hebrew inscription to the interior can be translated as 'The Dead will the Lord make live" from the daily liturgy.

HISTORY: This cemetery was established privately by Benjamin Norden in 1872 in order to bury his wife and was given to the Jewish community of Ramsgate. Although Jews had been resident in Ramsgate since 1786, Sephardic Jews had, up to this time, been buried at Mile End in London and Ashkenazi Jews at Canterbury. A plan dated 9th January 1878 and the 1896 Ordnance Survey map shows that the cemetery was originally a small square plot of ground surrounding the ohel, which was presumably built in 1872 when the cemetery was established. The burial ground has been administered by the Spanish and Portuguese Jewish community since 1887 and was extended in 1931 as shown on the 1939 OS map.

SOURCES: Sharman Kadish "Jewish Heritage in England - An Architectural Guide". English Heritage (2006) p.63

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION: * This is an intact ohel of which only about 55 examples are known to exist in England of which only a handful are listed; * The ohel was built circa 1872; only one listed example and two unlisted are earlier in date; * It is a rare example of an ohel at a privately-owned cemetery which was then donated to the local Jewish community; * The attached contemporary part of the cemetery wall is part of the original design.

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
502750
Legacy System:
LBS

Sources

Books and journals
Kadish, S, Jewish Heritage in England, an Architectural Guide, (2006), 63

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Your Contributions

Do you know more about this entry?

The following information has been contributed by users volunteering for our Enriching The List project. For small corrections to the List Entry please see our Minor Amendments procedure.

The information and images below are the opinion of the contributor, are not part of the official entry and do not represent the official position of Historic England. We have not checked that the contributions below are factually accurate. Please see our terms and conditions. If you wish to report an issue with a contribution or have a question please email [email protected].