TYNE METROPOLITAN COLLEGE, ACADEMY CAMPUS

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II
List Entry Number:
1392979
Date first listed:
10-Nov-2008
Statutory Address:
TYNE METROPOLITAN COLLEGE, ACADEMY CAMPUS, HAWKEY'S LANE

Map

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Location

Statutory Address:
TYNE METROPOLITAN COLLEGE, ACADEMY CAMPUS, HAWKEY'S LANE

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
North Tyneside (Metropolitan Authority)
National Grid Reference:
NZ 34719 68953, NZ 34734 68983

Reasons for Designation

This 1909 secondary school is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons:

* Its overall design combining classical proportions with art nouveau influence is unusual and effective

* the use of extensive art nouveau motifs in terracotta presents a distinctive and interesting exterior

* its interesting symmetrical plan was built as a piece and there are signs of innovation in the two tiered hall with balcony, gallery and classrooms opening off on two levels

* the optimism and aspirations of a large urban community are reflected in the imposing design of this school

* it remains largely intact and those interventions which have taken place have been achieved sensitively

* largely intact schools displaying this level of architectural interest combined with elements of innovation in planning are not common

Details



1022/0/10061 HAWKEY'S LANE 10-NOV-08 TYNE METROPOLITAN COLLEGE, ACADEMY CAM PUS

II Secondary School, 1909 designed by J C Maxwell for the Tynemouth Education Committee and built by J L Miller.

MATERIALS: Red brick in English Garden Wall Bond with extensive use of yellow terracotta for the dressings, cladding and ornamentation. Roofs are of welsh slate and metal rain water heads embossed with the school shield are present throughout.

PLAN: Symmetrical design comprising large central rectangular block housing hall with classrooms off, large assembly theatre and administrative functions; attached wings to the north and south each form three sides of an open courtyard, with a caretaker's house incorporated into the corner of the north courtyard.

EXTERIOR: Main (East) Elevation: three storeys and five bays with a prominent eaves cornice; the two end bays have full height strip pilasters alternating with flat-arched window openings with raised keystones. Windows are mostly horned sashes with divided top hung casements and those to the 2nd floor are horned sashes set in terracotta cladding with art nouveau detailing. Each pilaster is carried through the eaves cornice by an art nouveau style pillar with curved capping. The ground floor of the central entrance bay projects slightly and has an ornate segmental arched entrance with a pediment above, flanked by art nouveau style Ionic columns with curved capping. The entrance retains its original double doors. To either side the walls have terracotta and brick banded decoration and a single sash window with divided upper pane. The 1st and 2nd floors of this bay are recessed, with triple 2-light replacement C20 windows at 2nd floor level and triple 9-light segmental headed windows on the 1st floor; these windows alternate with terracotta Ionic strip pilasters in art nouveau style. Above this there is a parapet pierced by triple occuli. The projecting flanking bays have terracotta and brick banded decoration to the ground floors with triple sash windows with divided top hung casements and raised keystones. Clasping art nouveau style pilasters adorn the corners of the 1st and 2nd floors carrying an entablature surmounted by a gable; the latter each has a plaque bearing the school coat of arms. The 2nd floors have stepped lights, the central light contained within a prominent window surround. The inner faces of these bays are similarly adorned with Ionic strip pilasters. The roofs are hipped with prominent ventilators and multiple brick chimneys. The attached single storey ranges at right and left have prominent and ornate entrances; each has a large round-arched doorway with alternating terracotta and red brick elongated voussoirs forming a sunburst pattern, flanked by art nouveau style Ionic pilasters decorated with festoons and which rise through the roof line; the word `GIRLS' and `BOYS' respectively fill the space above the doorway in art nouveau lettering. The single storey ranges to either side have banded terracotta courses and central keystones with rows of 2-light windows with divided upper panes. Roofs are hipped with tall brick stacks and ridge ventilators, those to the left range with ornate cupolas.

Rear (West) Elevation: the central section of this elevation has paired rectangular windows flanked by an entrance to the ground floor with at 1st floor level, six 6-light segmental windows with a cornice and parapet above. The 2nd floor is set slightly to the rear of the parapet and has paired full dormers with art nouveau detailing and a square projecting tower at either end. To either end of the central section there is a 5 bay 2-storey square projection comprising a rectangular tower with castellated pediment attached to a semi-circular projection with an oriel window and corner pillars rising above a curving parapet; this ends in a 3 bay section with a castellated parapet and art nouveau detailing. There is an entrance through each of the curving projections with a cartouche in terracotta above. The single storey ranges attached to right and left comprise former play sheds or pavilions which opened to the west onto the once extensive playing fields. Each comprises a central section of 9 bays with timber boarding and a central entrance with a timber gablet above; at either end there are pyramidal roofed changing rooms with roof ventilators.

North and South Returns: 5 bays and 3 storeys with rows of tall double and single light windows to all floors with similar detailing to the main elevation. Similar strip pilasters break the roof line with curving caps and paired gables with single oculus. The end bay of each return is formed by a stair tower with segmental windows, raised in height with a rebuilt chimney.

INTERIOR: a single storey vestibule opens into a large double height rectangular space with a coffered ceiling supported on substantial Ionic columns, which reflect the art nouveau style of the exterior. The east end is dominated by a double height wooden segmental arcade with art nouveau applied motifs, which continues around the north and south sides; at 1st floor level this carries a gallery with a wooden balustrade; at the centre of the eastern side, opposing flights of stairs descend to a lower balcony supporting the headmaster's dais. To the right and left classrooms open off this feature. Administrative rooms including a headmaster's room with fireplace and panelling occupy the ground floor of the arcade and further to the right there is a large wooden panel commemorating the staff and old boys who fought during the First World War; classrooms also open off at this level. The main assembly theatre, originally designed to be closed off behind sliding partitions, has a coffered plaster ceiling, panelling to the side walls and ornate art nouveau influenced ionic columns.

SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: the surrounding brick wall has stone copings and replacement railings; it is pierced by a main public entrance flanked by ornate gate piers, each bearing a plate listing those fallen during the First World War; similar gate piers flank the girls and boys entrances and there are single corner pillars.

HISTORY: The 1902 Education Act replaced school boards and placed education directly under the control and management of town councils and established for the first time a publicly maintained system of secondary education. Municipal secondary schools were established to do for the great industrial areas what Endowed Grammar schools had done for the county and market towns. By 1904 the town council of Tynemouth Borough had established a new municipal secondary school in an existing school building but by 1907, with rising numbers of pupils, it was clear that a new building was imperative and work began on the new school at Hawksey Lane, North Shields.

This school was designed by local architect J C Maxwell and the main contractor was J L Miller of North Shields. The school was constructed to take c. 400 pupils and cost c.£27,500 and as well as serving as a secondary school, it also functioned as a centre for the training of pupil teachers and for holding evening classes. It was officially opened on the 8th November, 1909 by Rev Canon Crawhall. The school consisted of a two tier hall with sixteen classrooms opening off it, separated from a large assembly theatre by sliding partitions which could be opened to combine the two large spaces. A gymnasium was provided beneath the assembly theatre. The third floor contained the specialist classrooms including a chemical and physical laboratory and art studios. The side wings contained dinning halls and kitchens and a cookery classroom for girls and woodworking rooms for the boys. During the First World War 12 masters and 402 old boys enrolled for service and 69 old boys fell. In 1945 a serious fire which began in the second floor laboratories caused considerable damage to the school's roof and resulted in some minor rebuilding of the upper parts.

The North Shields and Newcastle architect, F C Maxwell, is largely unknown on a national level and this school may be his most significant work; between 1896 and 1902 he worked in partnership with William Hope of Newcastle, the prolific and respected architect best known as a theatre designer. During their collaboration Hope and Maxwell worked on the rebuilding of the Scotia Music Hall, Glasgow (burnt down in 1961) and Heaton Methodist Church, Newcastle. The latter building of 1902 is described in Pevsner as possessing some 'perverse detail' and it is included in the local list. Features of this building such as the curving crenelations, the projecting semi-circular tower base and the ornate floral décor prefigure the style of the Tynemouth school. The local author Robert Westhall attended the school during the 1930s and the building figures in some of his books for example `Falling into Glory' (1993). Although Westhall is not well known in England outside of the North East, he published more than 40 novels and is considered by some to be one of the best children's authors of the C20.

SOURCES: - Seabourne, M. and Lowe, R., The English School, vol. II, 1870-1970 (1977) - various records and papers held in North Shields Local Studies Library including: original drawing of new school; newspaper articles recording the opening ceremony and a contemporary description; Coming of Age Celebrations 1925 commemorative booklet. Evening News 30 April 1945 - School Blaze. The architecture of entertainment run riot: William Hope of Newcastle, 1862-1907, Northern History (1991), 27, pp184-97 - N Pevsner, The Buildings of England: Northumberland 2nd ed 1992 p506

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION DECISION: This 1909 Secondary School is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons:

* Its overall design combining classical proportions with art nouveau influence is unusual and effective * the use of extensive art nouveau motifs in terracotta presents a distinctive and interesting exterior * its interesting symmetrical plan was built as a piece and there are signs of innovation in the two tiered hall with balcony, gallery and classrooms opening off on two levels * the optimism and aspirations of a large urban community are reflected in the imposing design of this school * it remains largely intact and those interventions which have taken place have been achieved sensitively * largely intact schools displaying this level of architectural interest combined with elements of innovation in planning are not common

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
504712
Legacy System:
LBS

Sources

Books and journals
Pevsner, N, The Buildings of England: Northumberland, (1992)
Seaborne, M, Lowe, R, The English School: Its Architecture and Organisation 1870-1970, (1977), 506

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

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