HAGG BRIDGE

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II
List Entry Number:
1393978
Date first listed:
15-Sep-2010
Statutory Address:
HAGG BRIDGE

Map

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Location

Statutory Address:
HAGG BRIDGE

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
East Riding of Yorkshire (Unitary Authority)
Parish:
Cottingwith
National Grid Reference:
SE7170345139

Reasons for Designation

Hagg Bridge on the Pocklington Canal is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons: * It is a pre-1840 canal structure and is one of a group crossing the Pocklington Canal * It was designed by George Leather, a well-known navigation engineer and designer * It remains largely in its original condition * It is of good architectural quality with a strong design.

Details

COTTINGWITH

1854/0/10004 POCKLINGTON CANAL 15-SEP-10 HAGG BRIDGE

GV II Canal bridge, 1818, designed by George Leather.

MATERIALS: Brick with stone voussoirs and coping.

PLAN: The bridge has two basket arches, the larger over the canal and a smaller one over a beck immediately to the north-west. The towpath runs beneath the canal arch on the north side. There are rectangular buttresses to either side of each arch. The smaller arch has some stonework on the south-west side, and some of the brickwork has been replaced with C20 brick. There is no brick parapet, but a concrete post and metal rail fence borders the road.

HISTORY: The Pocklington Canal was constructed at the beginning of the C19 to transport mainly agricultural goods from the East Riding to the larger urban centres to the south and west. A Bill was placed before Parliament in 1814 and the canal was designed by George Leather Jnr, an experienced navigation engineer who worked on Goole Docks and the Knottingley and Goole Canal. The canal was opened in 1818, running for 9.5 miles from the River Derwent at East Cottingwith to a mile south of Pocklington. The cost was £32,695, which was actually less than the original estimate.

Coal, lime, fertiliser and industrial goods were carried to Pocklington, and agricultural produce was sent to the West Riding. After 1847, when the canal was sold to the York and North Midland Railway, there was a decline in trade and the last cargo was carried on the canal in 1932. In 1963 ownership passed to British Waterways. It is now navigable as far as Melbourne, and some of the locks have been restored by the Pocklington Canal Amenity Society (formed in 1969), but it is a remainder waterway and there are no plans to restore the canal fully. Hagg Bridge is one of four bridges crossing the canal designed by George Leather.

SOURCES: Pocklington Canal Amenity Society, The Pocklington Canal, 2008

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION: Hagg Bridge on the Pocklington Canal is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons: * It is a pre-1840 canal structure and is one of a group crossing the Pocklington Canal * It was designed by George Leather, a well-known navigation engineer and designer * It remains largely in its original condition * It is of good architectural quality with a strong design.

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
506365
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

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