Number 21 Sewer Ventilation Column in St James Road (north side)

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II
List Entry Number:
1469870
Date first listed:
23-Apr-2020
Location Description:
St James Road (north side), adjacent to number 64, SM5 2DU

Map

Ordnance survey map of Number 21 Sewer Ventilation Column in St James Road (north side)
© Crown Copyright and database right 2020. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2020. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
Use of this data is subject to Terms and Conditions.

The above map is for quick reference purposes only and may not be to scale. For a copy of the full scale map, please see the attached PDF - 1469870.pdf

The PDF will be generated from our live systems and may take a few minutes to download depending on how busy our servers are. We apologise for this delay.

This copy shows the entry on 01-Jun-2020 at 03:17:19.

Location

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

Location Description:
St James Road (north side), adjacent to number 64, SM5 2DU
County:
Greater London Authority
District:
Sutton (London Borough)
Parish:
Non Civil Parish
National Grid Reference:
TQ2738865281

Summary

A sewer ventilation column of around 1896-1903, located on the north side of St James Road, Carshalton, LB Sutton. Constructed by W Macfarlane & Co, for a sewerage scheme by Baldwin Latham (1836-1917) and one of around 28 remaining in Carshalton.

Reasons for Designation

Sewer ventilation column number 21, located on the north side of St James Road, Carshalton, LB Sutton, constructed around 1896-1903, by W Macfarlane & Co for a sewerage scheme by Baldwin Latham (1836-1917), and one of 28 remaining in Carshalton, is listed at Grade II for the following principal reasons:   Architectural interest:   *  designed by the notable sanitation engineer Baldwin Latham (1836-1917), and constructed by the Glasgow-based foundry, W Macfarlane & Co, it is a tall and impressive structure with good quality cast-iron mouldings and decoration;   * the column survives well, retaining its key functional features;   * sewer ventilation columns were once a common feature of the street scene, but original examples of this scale and quality are increasingly rare.   Historic interest:   * as an example of the work of Baldwin Latham, the Victorian sanitation engineer who by the late C19, had designed the sewerage, irrigation and water works for 15 English towns, including the schemes at Carshalton, Croydon, Birmingham, Harrow and Rugby.   Group value:   * as one of a group of around 28 sewer ventilation columns in Carshalton, collectively demonstrating the scale of a Victorian sewer system.

History

The Public Health Act of 1875 delivered legislation to help enable the construction of sewer systems across England, in an era of rapidly expanding population. The former Carshalton Urban District Council funded a plan in 1896 which had been prepared by the engineer Baldwin Latham (1836-1917) of Victoria Street, Westminster. The first phase of the scheme was built between 1896 and 1900, with a southern extension added around 1903. The sewer ventilation columns for the scheme were constructed by W Macfarlane & Co, a renowned Glasgow-based ironwork foundry. Their function was to dispel the sewer odour, high above the ground.

Baldwin Latham was a surveyor to the Croydon Board of Health from 1863 to 1870, and was later in private practice as an engineer. By the late C19 he had designed the sewerage, irrigation and water works for 15 English towns, including the schemes at Carshalton, Croydon, Birmingham, Harrow and Rugby. He is also cited as the engineer for the sewerage system in Bideford, Devon which included sewer ventilation columns, three of which are listed at Grade II. Latham was also the author of the publication ‘Sanitary engineering: a guide to the construction of works of sewerage and house drainage’ (1873).

It is not known how many sewer ventilation columns were erected in Carshalton, but around 28 survive.

Details

A sewer ventilation column of around 1896-1903, located on the north side of St James Road, Carshalton, LB Sutton. Constructed by W Macfarlane & Co, for a sewerage scheme by Baldwin Latham (1836-1917) and one of around 28 remaining in Carshalton.

MATERIALS: cast-iron

DETAILS: the cylindrical sewer ventilation column is around 9m high and is designed to resemble a Classical column with pedestal, moulded base and enriched capital. It is constructed of two conjoined lengths of pipe, linked with a flanged joint. On top of the capital is an ornate arrow, thought either to orientate the vent into the wind or to indicate the line of the sewer. Above this is a ball with vents facing in all four directions, the whole surmounted by a tall finial encircled with a coronet. The pedestal is marked with the maker's name, heavily over-painted, but appearing to read, ‘W MACFARLANE & CO, GLASGOW’.

Sources

Other
Insley, J, ‘Latham, Baldwin (1836-1917)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004), (Available online at: https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/52328)
Newspaper article of 1897, announcing the construction of Carshalton sewer held at the London Borough of Sutton Archive, under reference LG4/711/5

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Your Contributions

Do you know more about this entry?

The following information has been contributed by users volunteering for our Enriching The List project. For small corrections to the List Entry please see our Minor Amendments procedure.

The information and images below are the opinion of the contributor, are not part of the official entry and do not represent the official position of Historic England. We have not checked that the contributions below are factually accurate. Please see our terms and conditions. If you wish to report an issue with a contribution or have a question please email [email protected].

Back
to top