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THE OLD RECTORY AND ATTACHED WALL

List Entry Summary

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

Name: THE OLD RECTORY AND ATTACHED WALL

List entry Number: 1053147

Location

THE OLD RECTORY AND ATTACHED WALL, CHURCH END

The building may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County: Oxfordshire

District: West Oxfordshire

District Type: District Authority

Parish: Standlake

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: II*

Date first listed: 12-Sep-1955

Date of most recent amendment: 17-Oct-1988

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: LBS

UID: 252342

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Building

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

STANDLAKE CHURCH END SP3903 (East side) 23/258 The Old Rectory and attached 12/09/55 wall (Formerly listed as Rectory)

GV II*

Rectory, now house. C13; remodelled and hall and parlour ranges built c.1480-1500 for Dr. Richard Salter; extended to right and parlour wing remodelled in 1661 for John Dale; altered c.1850 for Reverend Francis Tuckwell. Coursed limestone rubble, rendered centre; gabled stone slate roof with C17 pyramidal finials; ridge stack of stone finished in brick; C17 stone lateral stacks, with sundial to right. Hall and cross wing plan: C13 right chamber block, late C15 hall and left parlour wing. 4-window range. Late C15 hood moulds over C20 windows in 2-storey left gable. Timber lintels over 2-light leaded casement, 8-pane sash and tripartite sash in 2-storey-and-attic right gable. Central hall range of one storey and attic, 2-window range, has mid C19 outshut to front with flat stone arches over mid C19 double doors and C20 three-light casements: similar casements in gabled dormers. Right side wall has late C15 two-light round-headed window and cross window, and mid C17 one-bay extension. Left side wall has hood moulds over mid C17 chamfered stone-mullioned windows of 2-, 3- and 4-lights, mid C17 stone lintel with Vitruvian scroll over blocked door: rear of left wing, built c.1850, has reset C15 pointed moulded doorway and lateral stack. Rear wall has sashes. Interior: C13 chamber block to right has blocked oriel opening to rear and blocked first-floor solar doorway to right; C13 coupled-rafter roof of very slight scantling with C13 common rafters of poles; early C18 dog-leg with winders staircase with turned balusters; ground floor room has C17 panelling from Magdalen College installed here c.1850. Hall range: late C15 two-light hollow-chamfered stone-mullioned and round-headed window in front wall; screens passage to right. 5-bay hall roof has 2 queen-post trusses to right and one to left, and unusual scissor trusses to centre of former open hall; roof has trenched through-purlins and windbraces. Ceiling inserted in C17: mid C19 plasterwork on ground floor; mid C17 panelled cupboards on first floor; room to left, remodelled c.1661, has timber-framed partition walls and moulded stone fireplace with black and white chequer-work to inner walls and faded painted panels to overmantle. Parlour range to left: two late C15 trusses to front with cusped pinnacles and struts; other features are c.1661, namely stop-chamfered beams with heart-shaped stops on ground floor, open fireplace with stop-chamfered bressumer on ground floor and moulded stone fireplace on first floor. Subsidiary features: L-shaped C18 limestone rubble wall extends approximately 20 metres to right. History: the very rare and complete C13 roof is of extremely small timbers which may reflect lost vernacular traditions of non-permanent building with poles. (Brigadier F.R.L. Goadby and Standlake Local History Society, Standlake House Survey, 1983, No.56).

Listing NGR: SP3987703490

Selected Sources

Books and journals
Goadby, F, Standlake House Survey, (1983)

National Grid Reference: SP 39877 03490

Map

Map
© Crown Copyright and database right 2017. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
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End of official listing