CHURCH OF ST MARY

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
I
List Entry Number:
1093240
Date first listed:
07-Mar-1973
Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST MARY

Map

Ordnance survey map of CHURCH OF ST MARY
© Crown Copyright and database right 2020. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2020. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
Use of this data is subject to Terms and Conditions.

The above map is for quick reference purposes only and may not be to scale. For a copy of the full scale map, please see the attached PDF - 1093240.pdf

The PDF will be generated from our live systems and may take a few minutes to download depending on how busy our servers are. We apologise for this delay.

This copy shows the entry on 22-Feb-2020 at 17:13:28.

Location

Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST MARY

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
Wiltshire (Unitary Authority)
Parish:
Tidworth
National Grid Reference:
SU 23541 47696

Details

TIDWORTH SU 24 NW TIDWORTH 1381/11/10019 Church of St Mary 7.3.73 I

Formerly listed in the Borough of Test Valley, Hampshire. Built at the expense of Sir John Kelk, of Tidworth House, in 1879, architect John Johnson; becoming the parish church, but now a Redundant church. Spectacular Geometrical Gothic design, with a nave of 3 bays with aisles, large south porch, chancel with north and south (not symmetrical) chapels to the western half, vestries north of chapel and eastern bay of the nave, western bell turret. Walls of coursed rock-faced stone with ashlar dressings, and a steep tiled roof. The prominent roof has tiny vents with gables containing trefoils, it extends to a low eaves across the aisles, but the other units have their separate gabled treatment. The elevations have buttresses, angled at corners, with steps and gabled tops: there are bands linking sills and connecting hood-moulds to the openings: moulded and stepped plinths. The windows to the aisles and vestry are of 2 and 3 lights, being lancets with cusped heads: the east gable has a quatrefoil above 3 stepped lancets with attached columns and there are similar lancets to each side of the chancel: at the west end are coupled tall lancets below trefoils on each side of the centre buttress, and there is a cinquefoil window in the vestry east gable. The most spectacular feature of the building is the very tall and slender bell turret (or fleche) which stands on a massive stepped buttress in the centre of the west gable: it has cylindrical form with gabled buttresses separating the 4 openings, and is topped by a spire. The porch has an arched opening on recessed orders of 3 attached columns, an interior arcade (of 6) leading to a south door, with recessed orders of 2 columns. Within, the building is tall, with a full expression in orderly arrangement, of clustered marble columns, with moulded bands and bases, and stiff-leaf capitals. Pilasters in the aisles form the springing points for half-arches. The rich effect is enhanced by decorative corbels, painted panels to the chancel ceiling, tiled floor to the nave and mosaic floor to the chancel, circular stone pulpit, brass eagle lectern and 6 brass candle-stands in the nave. The square font is raised on 2 steps in front of a niche (within the massive west-end buttress).



Listing NGR: SU2353947699

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
140127
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Your Contributions

Do you know more about this entry?

The following information has been contributed by users volunteering for our Enriching The List project. For small corrections to the List Entry please see our Minor Amendments procedure.

The information and images below are the opinion of the contributor, are not part of the official entry and do not represent the official position of Historic England. We have not checked that the contributions below are factually accurate. Please see our terms and conditions. If you wish to report an issue with a contribution or have a question please email [email protected].