CHORLTON NEW MILL AND ATTACHED CHIMNEY

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II
List Entry Number:
1197774
Date first listed:
11-Mar-1988
Date of most recent amendment:
06-Jun-1994
Statutory Address:
CHORLTON NEW MILL AND ATTACHED CHIMNEY, CAMBRIDGE STREET

Map

Ordnance survey map of CHORLTON NEW MILL AND ATTACHED CHIMNEY
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Location

Statutory Address:
CHORLTON NEW MILL AND ATTACHED CHIMNEY, CAMBRIDGE STREET

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
Manchester (Metropolitan Authority)
National Grid Reference:
SJ 83932 97347

Details

MANCHESTER

SJ8397 CAMBRIDGE STREET 698-1/19/36 (East side) 11/03/88 Chorlton New Mill and attached chimney (Formerly Listed as: CAMBRIDGE STREET (East side) Chorlton New Mill)

GV II

Cotton spinning mill, now partially used as rubber processing works. 1814, extended in 1818 and 1845, with chimney dated 1853. Red brick with slate roofs throughout; cast iron and brick fireproof internal structure. Original block is parallel to Cambridge Street; 8 storeys (including 2 below street level), 20 bays, each with small rectangular window with cambered brick head. Internal engine house towards N end, segregated from main body of mill by cross wall built to incorporate vertical main-shaft, ducts, ventilation system and hoist, and with fireproof staircase located behind engine house; originally built with internal boiler house to S of cross wall. Internal construction has cast iron columns supporting cast iron beams and transverse brick arches; the original roof structure may have been cast and wrought iron, but was later replaced. Parallel single storeyed roof-lit shed in narrow yard to front of mill possibly built as loom shed in early-mid C19 (see Clark). Chimney adjacent to NW dated 1853; brick with iron bands; octagonal. Wing parallel to Hulme Street added in 1818; 6 storeyed, 12 bays, with central segmentally arched entrance to yard, and small rectangular windows with cambered brick heads in each bay. Fireproof internal structure (cast iron columns and transverse brick arches). 3 storeyed office building adjoins to E. The 2 ranges were linked in 1845 by a 6 storey block to SW of site (on corner of Cambridge Street and Hulme Street); 6 bays to Hulme Street, and 4 bays beneath parallel gables to Cambridge Street. Blocked round-arched windows cut by later fenestration indicate former internal engine house in SW of site (on corner of Cambridge Street and Hulme Street); 6 bays to Hulme Street, and 4 bays beneath parallel gables to Cambridge Street. Blocked round-arched windows cut by later fenestration indicate former internal engine house in SW corner of this building originally intended to serve all 3 blocks on the site (originally with boiler house and chimney on opposite side of street, linked by a tunnel at least until construction of extant chimney to N of site). Fireproof internal structure. Weaving sheds added to N of site in 1829 have been demolished and built over. HISTORY: The mill was developed by a partnership which also operated the near-by Chorlton Old Mill (as well as other mills on Oxford Road which are no longer extant), and by 1838 they had also formed a partnership with Charles Macintosh who was using the nearby Cambridge Street rubber works site for the production of rubberised cloth. Included as a fine example of early large-scale mill building; the 1814 mill may be the oldest surviving fireproof mill in Manchester, and the multi-phase site is a good example of a type of development and layout which became characteristic of C19 urban mills. (Williams M, with Farnie DA: Cotton Mills in Greater Manchester: London: 1993-: 158-159; Industrial Archaeology Review: Clark S: Chorlton Mills and their neighbours: Oxford: 1978-: 207-239).

Listing NGR: SJ8393297347

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
387963
Legacy System:
LBS

Sources

Books and journals
Williams, , Farnie, , Cotton Mills in Greater Manchester, (1993), 158-159
Clark, S, 'Industrial Archaeology Review' in Chorlton Mills And Their Neighbours, (1978), 207-239

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 30 Jun 2001
Reference: IOE01/04281/32
Rights: Copyright IoE Mr Charles Madders. Source Historic England Archive
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