CHURCH OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
I
List Entry Number:
1217661
Date first listed:
24-Feb-1958
Date of most recent amendment:
05-Feb-1970
Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS, TRAFALGAR SQUARE WC2

Map

Ordnance survey map of CHURCH OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS
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Location

Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS, TRAFALGAR SQUARE WC2

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:
Greater London Authority
District:
City of Westminster (London Borough)
National Grid Reference:
TQ 30102 80541

Details

TQ 3080 NW CITY OF WESTMINSTER TRAFALGAR SQUARE, WC2 72/135 Church of St Martin-in- 24.2.58 the Fields G.V. I Parish Church. 1722-26 by James Gibbs. Portland stone, leaded roof. Highly influential design combining (incongruously) Vitruvian temple with steeple and very restrained, minor use of Baroque detail (in tactfully judged political contrast to St Mary-le-Strand). Giant Corinthian hexastyle, 2 column deep portico, on podium of steps, carrying the pediment-gable end continuation of the roof line. The west front proper has one extra bay each side (of portico) and staged tower and steeple rise above it behind the portico. These end bays are flanked by giant Corinthian pilasters and their returns are emphasised as the tower bay by giant Corinthian columns in antis; 5 bays of 2 tiers of semicircular arched "Gibbs surround" windows then express the body of the church, terminating in a similarly emphasised bay to that of tower. Large Venetian east window. Fine interior, evolving from Wren's St Clement Danes and St James's Piccadilly, with a giant order as used by Hawksmoor carrying arches and the segmental tunnel vault, the inevitable galleries butting into column shafts. The chancel is narrower than the nave with noteworthy and theatrical feature of boxes to sides (that to north the Royal Pew) set on splay as a transition between nave and chancel. Fine plasterwork by Artari and Bagutti, fittings and momuments, lowered box-pews, etc. It was Nash who isolated the church as part of his West Strand Improvements, integrating it with the composition of Trafalgar Square. Survey of London; Vol XX Georgian London; John Summerson. London Vol I: N Pevsner.

Listing NGR: TQ3010280538

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
207262
Legacy System:
LBS

Sources

Books and journals
Pevsner, N, Cherry, B, The Buildings of England: London I - The Cities of London and Westminster, (1973)
Summerson, J, Georgian London, (1945)
'Survey of London' in Trafalgar Square and neighbourhood The Parish of St Martin-in-the-Fields Part 3: Volume 20 , , Vol. 20, (1979)

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 05 Sep 2004
Reference: IOE01/12604/24
Rights: Copyright IoE Mr John Bird. Source Historic England Archive
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