CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II
List Entry Number:
1234634
Date first listed:
24-Oct-1950
Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY, DOVER STREET

Map

Ordnance survey map of CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY
© Crown Copyright and database right 2019. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2019. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
Use of this data is subject to Terms and Conditions.

The above map is for quick reference purposes only and may not be to scale. For a copy of the full scale map, please see the attached PDF - 1234634.pdf

The PDF will be generated from our live systems and may take a few minutes to download depending on how busy our servers are. We apologise for this delay.

This copy shows the entry on 15-Nov-2019 at 20:52:02.

Location

Statutory Address:
CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY, DOVER STREET

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
Isle of Wight (Unitary Authority)
Parish:
Ryde
National Grid Reference:
SZ 59542 92384

Details



632/2/50 DOVER STREET 24-OCT-50 (East side) CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY

II Parish Church, 1845 with transepts added in 1848 and 1860, and minor C20 modifications. Thomas Hellyer, local architect. Early English style and cruciform plan. Ragstone rubble walls with ashlar dressings; slate roofs with some polychromy. EXTERIOR: To southwest, a tall tower with narrow triple lancet window, corner buttresses and capped with an octagonal bell stage and a fine steeple. This has pointed arch main door with moulded stone architrave and colonettes, and a pronounced corner stair tower. Apsidal chancel has rounded lower room to corner, and hipped roof with small blind arcade on corbels below eaves. Windows are single or paired lancets under thin hood moulds. Butresses around the building with slate caps and quoins. Entrance porch under pitched roof has arched opening under moulded surround including dog tooth. Timber door has decorative hinges. INTERIOR: Nave and aisles have tall moulded arcade on slender clustered colonettes with moulded capitals. Roof incorporates slender rafters and trusses with cross braces and angled struts that cuved to arcade wall and rest on corbelled blocks. Talle pointed chancel arch to 3-sided chancel. Wooden pews in nave and aisle incorporate fleur de lys finials, and have doors into pew, with an additional open attached seat flanking the aisle in each row. Timber screens in side chapel, and some dado panelling. Wide arch has been infilled with C20 boarding to separate the space. Central aisle has Victorian floor tiles. Figurative coloured glass in lancets. Octagonal stone font. SUBSIDIARY: Rubble stone wall with stone gate piers with fleur de lys to top.

A parish church of 1845 with some mid-C19 additions by the notable local architect Thomas Hellyer. It is comprehensively of good quality and in a studied Early English style, and it survives well. Furthermore, the bold tower spire makes it a prominent landmark when approaching Ryde from the Solent.

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
410622
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 10 Jul 2001
Reference: IOE01/14510/15
Rights: Copyright IoE Miss Sarah Meaker. Source Historic England Archive
Archive image, may not represent current condition of site.
To view this image please use Firefox, Chrome, Safari, or Edge.

Your Contributions

Do you know more about this entry?

The following information has been contributed by users volunteering for our Enriching The List project. For small corrections to the List Entry please see our Minor Amendments procedure.

The information and images below are the opinion of the contributor, are not part of the official entry and do not represent the official position of Historic England. We have not checked that the contributions below are factually accurate. Please see our terms and conditions. If you wish to report an issue with a contribution or have a question please email [email protected].