EALING COMMON LONDON REGIONAL TRANSPORT UNDERGROUND STATION, INCLUDING VESTIBULE SHOPS AND PLATFORMS

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II
List Entry Number:
1249986
Date first listed:
17-May-1994
Statutory Address:
EALING COMMON LONDON REGIONAL TRANSPORT UNDERGROUND STATION, INCLUDING VESTIBULE SHOPS AND PLATFORMS, UXBRIDGE ROAD

Map

Ordnance survey map of EALING COMMON LONDON REGIONAL TRANSPORT UNDERGROUND STATION, INCLUDING VESTIBULE SHOPS AND PLATFORMS
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Location

Statutory Address:
EALING COMMON LONDON REGIONAL TRANSPORT UNDERGROUND STATION, INCLUDING VESTIBULE SHOPS AND PLATFORMS, UXBRIDGE ROAD

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County:
Greater London Authority
District:
Ealing (London Borough)
National Grid Reference:
TQ 18887 80414

Details

UXBRIDGE ROAD (south side [off]) TQ 18 SE Ealing Common LRT 962-/2/10017 Underground Station, including vestibule shops and platforms II

London Underground Station. 1931 by Charles Holden, supervised on site by Stanley Heaps. Portland stone ticket hall with flat roof on concrete bridge, concrete stairs and cantilevered platforms with brick infil. Single-storey entrance facade with central opening under projecting canopy. Behind it rises the heptagonal drum of the ticket hall, incorporating three kiosks in side walls. At rear, stairs under stepped enclosures lead to platforms, at their feet semi-enclosed shelters with original fixed seating. Canopies higher at rear of platform, incorporating metal clerestory glazing. Original roundel signs on flank walls fully lined out in black. All windows are metal glazed, some with casement openings. Ticket hall features floor tiling with heptagonal star mirroring structure, original bronze shop fronts to kiosks with over them a band of decorative tiling in three shades of grey and white. Above them metal windows with vertical glazing bars and narrow margins top and bottom; all save that to street with Underground roundel outlined by glazing bars, plain glass. Coffered ceiling. The entrance canopy also has a coffered soffit, with over it a projecting solid roundel, its pole restored since 1987. Included as one of only two examples of the Underground style of architecture in transition between the classical style of 1920s' stations and the Scandinavian or Dutch inspired models that followed later. Source: Lawrence Menear, London's Underground Stations, 1985.

Listing NGR: TQ1888780414

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
432208
Legacy System:
LBS

Sources

Books and journals
Menear, L, Londons Underground Stations, (1985)

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Date: 21 Aug 1999
Reference: IOE01/01127/03
Rights: Copyright IoE Mr Quiller Barrett. Source Historic England Archive
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