EAST GATE

Overview

Heritage Category:
Listed Building
Grade:
II*
List Entry Number:
1394942
Date first listed:
11-Aug-1972
Date of most recent amendment:
15-Oct-2010
Statutory Address:
EAST GATE, BOAT STALL LANE

Map

Ordnance survey map of EAST GATE
© Crown Copyright and database right 2020. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
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Location

Statutory Address:
EAST GATE, BOAT STALL LANE

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District:
Bath and North East Somerset (Unitary Authority)
National Grid Reference:
ST 75175 64871

Details

BOAT STALL LANE

East Gate 11/08/72

GV II*

City gate. Medieval, or possibly C9-C10, restored probably in 1899 when the adjacent Empire Hotel was built. MATERIALS: Coursed limestone, paved on the top surface over the arch. EXTERIOR: Narrow archway, now well below street level, approx. 2m in width, 1m deep and 2-2.5m in height. Jambs chamfered on outside face, appear to be medieval. Cranked arch of three stones on corbels, relieving arch above and horizontal courses over. Inner face arch is similar, but segmental. Full extent of reconstruction in 1899 uncertain, but close in appearance to C18 engravings, and to photographs of c1890. The Eastgate of Bath has minor gate on Boat Stall Lane going down to quay and Bathwick ferry, and was left open for the convenience of citizens. Portion of wall with crowning battlements survived alongside until 1899 (qv Upper Borough Walls). HISTORY: The city wall originated in C4 towards the end of the Roman period. It was repaired in the early C10, and was then kept in use until the Civil War. Pepys reported that it was in good condition in 1668, but it gradually decayed until most was demolished in the C18: the Corporation demolished the north and south gates in 1755, and the south gate followed in 1776. This is also known as the Lot Gate, from the Early English ludeat, or postern gate. Its narrowness suggests that this was never a principal entrance, but is nonetheless of great significance as the only surviving medieval gate in the city. SOURCES: B. Cunliffe, The City of Bath (1986), 78-79; M. Hamilton, Bath before Beau Nash (1978), 14; Peter Davenport, Medieval Bath Uncovered (2002), 126 ff. Scheduled Monument ref: OCN BA 115.

Listing NGR: ST7517564871

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
510358
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

End of official listing

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