A nurse filling a patient's amputation wound with sulphathiazole, Royal Infirmary, Infirmary Road, Sheffield

A nurse filling a patient's amputation wound with sulphathiazole, Royal Infirmary, Infirmary Road, Sheffield
Photograph taken 10 October 1942 © Source: Historic England Archive ref: med01_01_3280

A nurse filling the pockets of a patient's amputation wound with sulphathiazole. Sulphathiazole is an anti-microbial compound that was used the help prevent the spread of infection in wounds. An article titled 'Sulphathiazole in the Treatment of War Wounds - By JANIES T. HEYL, M.D.' from the journal 'Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine' in October 1941 describes recent trials of sulphathiazole. The following is a quote from the article summing up the findings of the trials:- 'Therefore it is fair to say that sulphathiazole has done no detectable harm, though its excretion as a hypersaturated urine is a real hazard. But it is only fitting to comment that most patients are very grateful to be off the drug.'

Location

South Yorkshire Sheffield

Period

World War Two (1939 - 1945)

Themes

Tags

medicine health people women nurse patient